Man City could be in next year’s Champions League if ban frozen

first_imgBy Simon EvansMANCHESTER, England (Reuters) – Manchester City could play in next season’s Champions League despite a two-year UEFA ban from European competition if they ask for the suspension to be frozen by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) during their appeal, sports law experts say.UEFA ruled on Friday that City had committed “serious breaches” of Financial Fair Play (FFP) regulations and failed to cooperate with its investigation, handing them a European ban and a 30 million euro (£24.9 million) fine.City, who have denied any wrongdoing, said they intended to appeal the decision to CAS in Switzerland and when they do they could ask for “provisional measures” which in effect would suspend the ban until a full hearing into the case is heard.The Premier League champions have not indicated if they will ask for such measures and CEO Ferran Soriano said in a statement yesterday that he hoped for a swift end to the case. “We are looking for an early resolution obviously, through a thorough process and a fair process, so my best hope is that this will be finished before the beginning of the summer and until then for us, it is business as usual,” he saidIf City do not ask for provisional measures then they risk having the ban kick in during the appeal process, after the draw for next season’s Champions League has taken place. The competition’s preliminary round draw is scheduled on June 9 and the group stage draw is set for August 27. PROVISIONAL MEASURES“It is very likely indeed, practically certain, that City will seek ‘provisional measures’ from the CAS,” leading Sports Law Barrister, John Mehrzad told Reuters.“That is their only way at present to seek such a stay of the disciplinary sanction since CAS has, at present, exclusive jurisdiction over the appeal under the UEFA Statutes.”City are currently second in the Premier League and on course to qualify for the Champions League. Their legal team would be keen to avoid a scenario where they successfully overturned the ban but had already suffered the cost of a season out of the competition.The only other way a decision could be made before the start of the Champions League process is if the case were expedited.Christopher Flanagan, managing editor of the International Sports Law Journal, said that would give both parties less time to prepare their arguments so City would be more inclined to press for provisional measures. “That is the most likely as it would give City some certainty while they prepare for a full hearing without risking their chances of being in the Champions League next year.“It would be a calculated gamble, though, as if they are unsuccessful a full non-expedited hearing may not take place until after the Champions League cycle is underway,” he said. Given CAS’s normal timeframe for scheduling hearings, City’s case might not be heard until early next year, although waiting times for hearings vary. If the case was to be expedited then it could be heard by July. FINANCIAL COSTMissing out on a Champions League season would cost City as much as £100 million in prize money and broadcast revenue, as well as match-day and other revenues.If City won a ‘stay’ but CAS then upheld UEFA’s ban, after the 2020-21 season was underway, then the club’s two-year suspension would take effect in the following two seasons. While neither UEFA nor City have made many details of the case public, the decision of the CAS panel would offer an early indication of their view on the strength of City’s appeal.“It will be very revealing to see what CAS does in terms of an application for provisional measures, as one of the factors that the president of the panel will take into account when deciding whether to grant provisional measures is the likelihood of success on the merits of the case,” said Mehrzad.City have 10 days from the receipt of UEFA’s full reasoning of their decision to put in an appeal. The CAS panel would then have to decide whether to accept any request for a ‘freeze’ on the ban from City, a decision which could be made by the end of March.last_img read more

Syracuse basketball opponent preview: What to know about No. 7 seed Dayton

first_imgThe Dayton Report: There are many of the same players that Dayton had on that 2014 team still on the roster — including four of its top five current scorers. The Flyers dominated the A-10 for most of the season but has lost four of its past eight games, including a three-point loss to St. Joseph’s in the conference tournament semifinals.Dayton has posted wins this season over Monmouth, Iowa, Vanderbilt and St. Bonaventure. Its worst losses this season were on the road at La Salle and at home against Rhode Island. It has the 13th most efficient defense in the nation, per Kenpom.com and is one of the best defensive rebounding teams, a strength that has hurt Syracuse in recent games against Pittsburgh and North Carolina. The Flyers do turn the ball over on nearly 19 percent of their possessions, which is above the Division I average, and don’t get a ton of offensive rebounds.MORE COVERAGE:Breaking down the Syracuse-Dayton matchupDougherty: One of Syracuse’s defining characteristics will no longer be enoughSyracuse basketball roundtable: SU-Dayton and Trevor Cooney’s legacy How Syracuse beats Dayton: Syracuse has to be able to crash both the defensive glass, and the offensive glass against Dayton. If it can keep the rebounding battle even and make some of its 3-pointers, it will be in pretty good shape. The last time the two teams met, Syracuse was empty from behind the arc and that cannot happen again. Trevor Cooney needs to awake from his stupor and so does Tyler Roberson. The Flyers might be struggling just like the Orange, but they’ve won games this year on the defensive end and on the glass, and Syracuse can’t play the slow type of game that Dayton has forced its opponents to play all season. Published on March 16, 2016 at 12:51 am Daily Orange File Photo Facebook Twitter Google+ Stats to know 8 — times this season that Dayton has won a game while holding opponents to under 60 points.10.8 — percent of 2-point shots that Steve McElvene blocks when he’s in the game, good for 14th in Division I, per Kenpom.4 — Four of Dayton’s top five scorers were a part of the 2013-14 team that beat Syracuse in the NCAA Tournament.Player to watch: Dyshawn Pierre is one of Dayton’s most high-volume scorers and also was its leading scorer against Syracuse in 2014. He posted 22 points in Dayton’s last game against St. Joseph’s. He may also be the guy with the ball in his hands late in this game if it’s close, since he’s a near-85 percent free-throw shooter, which is definitely rare for his big-man stature. Comments Daily Orange File Photo Syracuse (19-13, 9-9 Atlantic Coast) opens up its NCAA Tournament run with Dayton (25-7, 14-4 Atlantic 10) on Friday in St. Louis. The Orange got into the Tournament as a No. 10 seed, overachieving on the projections that had it as either one of the last four teams in or completely out.After missing out on the NCAA Tournament last season, Syracuse is back. And here is everything you need to know about the No. 7 seed Flyers.All-time Series: Friday will mark the fourth time that the Flyers and Orange have met. Syracuse is 1-2 and hasn’t won since the inaugural meeting in 1975.Last time they played: The two teams haven’t met since March 22, 2014. That also happened to be in the Round of 32 in the NCAA Tournament, when the No. 3-seeded Orange lost a 55-53 decision to No. 11-seed Dayton. Dyshawn Pierre and Jordan Sibert were the only players in double figures for the Flyers. And while Tyler Ennis led all scorers with 19 points, his buzzer-beating game-winning shot was off the mark and it ended an SU season that started out 25-0.“When it left my hands it looked good,” Ennis said after the game. “Up until I saw it bounce out, I thought it was going to bounce back in.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse shot 0-of-10 from 3 in that game and was outrebounded. The Flyers shot better, but still the Orange had a last-minute chance to avoid the upset. Many players were in the locker room crying after the loss. Related Stories Rapid thoughts on Syracuse-Dayton NCAA Tournament matchupDougherty: 1 of Syracuse’s defining characteristics will no longer be enoughBOUNCED OUT: Dayton upsets Syracuse 55-53 in Round of 32 as Ennis’ game-winning attempt rims outSyracuse basketball roundtable: Dayton rematch, what SU needs to do to win and Trevor Cooney’s legacyFormer SU Provost Eric Spina: ‘I have a new love and that’s Dayton’last_img read more

3M Open: Matthew Wolff joins elite company with victory

first_imgMatthew Wolff joined elite company with his first PGA Tour win at the 3M Open on Sunday.The 20-year-old golfer became just the third player to win the individual title at the NCAA Championship and a PGA Tour crown in the same year. Wolff — whose unusual swing has drawn plenty of attention — joined 15-time major champion Tiger Woods and two-time major winner Ben Crenshaw in that club, according to the PGA Tour. He became the ninth youngest winner in PGA Tour history and the youngest since Jordan Spieth’s success at the John Deere Classic in 2013.Wolff joins Ben Crenshaw and Tiger Woods as the only players to win the individual title at the NCAA Championships and a PGA TOUR title in the same year.— PGA TOUR Communications (@PGATOURComms) July 7, 2019Wolff fired a six-under 65 in the final round at the 3M Open, winning by one stroke from Bryson DeChambeau and Collin Morikawa.He made a 26-foot eagle putt at the final hole to secure his victory.AMAZING! @Matthew_Wolff5 makes EAGLE to win! It’s the 20-year-old’s first PGA TOUR victory.#LiveUnderPar pic.twitter.com/LYMXFIduPI— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) July 7, 2019last_img read more