Brendan Bomberry delivers No. 6 Syracuse in an 8-7 overtime thriller at No. 14 Johns Hopkins

first_img Published on March 18, 2017 at 6:28 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 BALTIMORE — After Ben Williams won the faceoff to start overtime, players huddled around the All-American specialist. He put Syracuse in position to win in sudden-death overtime against archrival Johns Hopkins. In the second-lowest scoring Syracuse-Johns Hopkins game since 1985, players welcomed any chance for a score.Sixty-one seconds later, junior midfielder Brendan Bomberry punched the winning score in from just outside the crease. In SU head coach John Desko’s 300th game, the player who hadn’t collected a point ended No. 6 Syracuse’s (5-1, 1-0 Atlantic Coast) fifth straight one-goal game, 8-7, over No. 14 Johns Hopkins (4-3) on Saturday afternoon at Homewood Field. With a defender on his tail, Bomberry caught a Sergio Salcido pass and, hardly pulling back his stick, pushed the ball past JHU goalie Gerald Logan.“Our guys drew slides and make it easy for me around the net,” Bomberry said. “If they don’t draw slides, I don’t get open.”Through six games, three game-winners by three different players illustrates the balance by which Syracuse’s offense thrives. In the first, a month ago against then-No. 12 Albany, Nick Mariano fired the game-winner with under two seconds on the clock. Against then-No. 9 Virginia two weeks ago, Salcido rifled the final score. On Saturday, Bomberry clinched the game, extending Syracuse’s streak to 45 consecutive wins when holding opponents to fewer than 10 goals.Midway through the season, SU hasn’t established a single go-to option. Jordan Evans has been inconsistent, Saturday included, when he had just one assist for an SU team that has scored fewer than 10 goals in back-to-back games. Yet Syracuse has resorted to a different player to bring magic to the offense late in games. Seven SU players have five goals or more, led by Bomberry’s 13 — none bigger than his last, which Nick Mariano set up with his no-look goal in the final minute of regulation.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAsked whom Hopkins keyed on in the final minutes, Blue Jays head coach Dave Pietramela shook his head. Junior midfielder Hunter Moreland snickered, then smirked as if to acknowledge SU’s diversified attack.“All of our guys can finish and make plays,” Bomberry said. “We have that many guys who can make plays and put the ball in the net for us.”The 56th all-time meeting between Syracuse and Johns Hopkins lacrosse started fitting enough. About 40 minutes before faceoff, a handful of players from both sides met at midfield for a pregame scuffle. Officials handed each side an unsportsmanlike penalty and both teams started a man down.Last year, Syracuse jumped out to a 4-0 lead, outshot JHU by 10 and picked up eight more ground balls. Yet the Orange committed 14 turnovers and blew its four-score lead on a rebound goal in the overtime heart-breaker for its first loss of 2016. The JHU loss started SU’s three-game losing skid.“Homewood,” senior attack Jordan Evans said before the season began, “that’s not a good memory going in there. We have the lead and give it up. It’s a good thing for us to go down there and make a statement.”Bomberry penned that statement in his first college game at Homewood. It buzzed as temperatures sat around 50 degrees. The JHU pep band played during stoppages. A steady hum came from the middle of the Johns Hopkins fan base all afternoon, no louder than in the final minutes of regulation. No quieter than after Bomberry’s blow to the Hopkins faithful.“You saw what happened when we slide too much,” Pietramala said. “The last two goals were off a slide. If you have a miscue on the interior, they find it.”The teams first met in 1921 with a 4-4 tie. Fifty-five meetings and nearly a century later, the units remain at the top of the sport. They’ve met each year since 1980. They’ve combined for 19 NCAA titles. For decades, Syracuse and Johns Hopkins have been the landing spots for the nation’s most prized recruits.Three of Syracuse’s 25 victories against Johns Hopkins have come with the national championship on the line. A single goal has now decided 14 of the last 29 meetings. In the most recent edition of college lacrosse’s most storied, intense rivalry, goals came at a premium. Syracuse held leads of 4-2, 5-4 and 6-4. Still, in a game during which no lead was safe, JHU inevitably fought back to pull within one. Then tie. Then take the lead, 7-6, before Mariano’s game-tying shot.This time, the Orange came out on top with the sight of Bomberry emerging from the crease, stick held high. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Gourmet meal $25,000 a pop

first_imgCooked by six three-star Michelin chefs – four from France and one each from Germany and Italy – the menu featured complicated creations such as “tartar of Kobe beef with Imperial Beluga caviar and Belon oysters” and “mousseline of `pattes rouges’ crayfish with morel mushroom infusion.” Among the talented chefs, some said they found it challenging to give diners their money’s worth. Antoine Westermann of Le Buerhiesel, a top-class restaurant in Strasbourg, France, said he shaved 3 1/2ounces of Perigord truffles – worth about $350 – onto each plate of his “coquille Saint-Jacques and truffles.” “For $25,000, what do you expect?” he said. As guests entered the dinner, held at the hotel’s rooftop restaurant on the 65th floor overlooking Bangkok, attendants bowed and scattered rose petals at their feet. Men wore tuxedos, and women were dripping in diamonds. The guests included Fortune 500 executives, a casino owner from Macau and a Taiwanese hotel owner, said Deepak Ohri, Lebua’s managing director. He declined to reveal their identities. BANGKOK, Thailand – It was an evening of utter decadence – a 10-course gourmet dinner concocted by world-renowned chefs at $25,000 a head. Many of those who attended Saturday night’s culinary extravaganza in Bangkok hailed it as the meal of a lifetime. But it’s no easy task to eat plate after plate of Beluga caviar, Perigord truffles, Kobe beef, Brittany lobster – each paired with a rare and robust vintage wine. “It’s really amazing,” said one diner, Sophiane Foster, a wealthy Cambodian who lives in Malaysia, as she eyed the dinner’s eighth course – a “pigeon en croute with cepes mushrooms.” “But I can’t finish it. Your senses can only appreciate so much.” High-rolling food lovers flew in from the United States, Europe, the Middle East and other parts of Asia for the 40-seat dinner organized by the Lebua luxury hotel in Bangkok, grandly titled “Epicurean Masters of the World.” “It’s surreal. The whole thing is surreal,” said Alain Soliveres, the celebrated chef of the Taillevent restaurant in Paris. Soliveres prepared two of his signature dishes, including the first course: a “creme brulee of foie gras” that was washed down with a 1990 Cristal champagne – a bubbly that sells for more than $500 a bottle, but still stood out as one of the cheapest wines on the menu. “To have brought together all of these three-star Michelin chefs, and to serve these wines for so many people is just an incredible feat,” Soliveres said. Chefs submitted their grocery lists to organizers beforehand, and the ingredients were flown in fresh: black truffles, foie gras, oysters and live Brittany lobsters from France; caviar from Switzerland; white truffles from Italy. Diners also sipped their way through legendary vintage wines, such as a 1985 Romanee Conti, a 1959 Chateau Mouton Rothschild, a 1967 Chateau d’Yquem and a 1961 Chateau Palmer. The latter is considered “one of the greatest single wines of the 20th century,” said Alun Griffiths of Berry Bros. & Rudd, the British wine merchants that procured and shipped about six bottles of each wine for the dinner. The wine alone cost more than $200,000, Griffiths said. “Just to have one of these would be a great treat. To have 10 of them in one evening is the sort of thing that people would kill for.” On the street, where much of Bangkok’s best food is served, the dinner generated talk of over-the-top excess. “That is a waste of money,” said Rungrat Ketpinyo, 44, who sells Phad Thai noodles for 75cents a plate from a street cart outside the hotel. Organizers say the event was designed to promote Thai tourism and that most of the profits will go to two charities – Medecins Sans Frontieres and the Chaipattana Foundation, a rural development program set up by the king of Thailand. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img