Lado celebrates the 70th anniversary of his artistic work

first_imgThe year in which it celebrates the 70th anniversary of its artistic activity, the Ensemble of Folk Dances and Songs of Croatia LADO is preparing the program “Let the sun shine on everyone where there is still our family”, fully dedicated to songs and dances of Croats abroad. An opportunity to show our guests our cultural and historical heritage. Inform your guests about LADO or better yet, as a host in family accommodation take them to a celebratory concert and be proud of our tradition, history and heritage. Zadar – wake up, it is quality and authentic content that tourists want to see and experience. It is a story we must tell our tourism. Photo: LADO The celebratory concert will be held in Zadar on April 26, 2019 at the Arsenal Zadar. Find out more about the concert HERE “During their turbulent past, especially in the period between the 15th and 17th centuries, Croats from the territory of today’s Republic of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina due to military activities sought refuge outside their homeland, inhabiting areas where they have remained to this day. Through all these centuries, separated from the motherland, they have preserved their identity and their traditional culture. Therefore, the Ensemble of Croatian Folk Dances and Songs LADO dedicates its seventieth birthday to them.”, Says the artistic director of the LADO Ensemble Andrija Ivančan and points out that the very name of the program calls on all peoples in the countries inhabited by Croats to love, peace, tolerance, respect and building bridges between peoples and their cultures. Lado are the guardians of our tradition, heritage and customs, and by their actions they take care that they do not disappear into oblivion. For more than seven decades, Lado has been performing on stages all over the world, and with over 5.000 performances in Croatia and 48 countries around the world, he tells the story of our customs and identity, the story of Croats. Lado certainly deserves the title of ambassador of Croatian tourism. LADO has a holdings with more than 1.200 sets of folk costumes of exceptional value and beauty, some of which are over 100 years old, so we can freely call it a traveling museum that is extremely valuable and important for preserving and nurturing our identity, culture and customs. I keep emphasizing how we should be and sell what we are – Croats. That is the very essence of tourism. Tourists want to hear, see and taste our history, our culture, our way of life.last_img read more

Economists say lots of things. Many of them are wrong

first_imgThere’s plenty of evidence, in the article and elsewhere, that this kind of deregulation has plenty to do with investment and job growth.There is also plenty of evidence that econ reporters at major publications have spent the past decade propping up economists who tell them what they want to hear.That is to say, they prop up economists who obsess over “inequality” rather than economic growth, who worry about the future of labor unions or climate change or whatever policy liberals happen to be plying at the moment.There are plenty of economists out there making good arguments for the free market who will never be member of the “economists say” clique.For eight years, we consistently heard about how “economists say” everything Democrats were doing was great (even when hundreds disagreed).Unsurprisingly, “economists” were wrong about a lot.The rosy predictions set by President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers regarding the “stimulus,” the administration’s prediction of 4.6 percent growth by 2012 and the Congressional Budget Office predictions about Obamacare were all way off base. But not to worry!Over the next few thousand words, the authors do their best to assure readers that neither deregulation nor tax cuts are really behind this new economic activity — even if business leaders keep telling them otherwise.For example, they claim that “There is little historical evidence tying regulation levels to growth.”A few paragraphs later, we again learn that “The evidence is weak that regulation actually reduces economic activity or that deregulation stimulates it.”A reporter without an agenda might have written that evidence was “arguable,” because I bet I could corral a bunch of economists to tell you that lowering the cost of doing business spurs economic activity quite often.And though the Trump administration somewhat overstates its regulatory cutbacks, it has stopped hundreds of Obama-era regulations from being enacted.Even better, it has stopped thousands of yet-to-be-invented regulations from ever being considered. Perhaps these corporations only did it all to gain favor with the administration.Hey, some people suck up to government by cutting bonus checks for their workers, and some people make electric cars no one wants.The fact is that deregulation and tax cuts matter.We already have evidence.We just don’t give voice to the economists who would tell us so.David Harsanyi is a senior editor at The Federalist and a nationally syndicated columnist.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists (Indeed, 36 percent of those polled gave the wholly rational answer of “uncertain.”)“We’ll be lucky to have 2 percent” growth, “economists say” regular Mark Zandi told CNN in May.Certainly, the economy doesn’t have the room to grow that it had in 2007 or 2012.But so far, Zandi is wrong about that.Neither deregulation nor tax cuts are a panacea.But businesses have already acted on deregulation and corporate tax cuts.Dozens of companies announced they would hand out bonus checks to hundreds of thousands of workers before the corporate tax cut was even signed into law. Categories: Editorial, Opinion“A wave of optimism has swept over American business leaders, and it is beginning to translate into the sort of investment in new plants, equipment and factory upgrades that bolsters economic growth, spurs job creation — and may finally raise wages significantly,” opens a recent New York Times article surveying the state of the American economy.One imagines that readers of the esteemed paper were surprised to run across such a rosy assessment after having been bombarded with news of a homicidal Republican tax plan for so many weeks. Vox, a leading light in the liberalism-masquerading-as-science genre, ran an article headlined “The Controversial Study Showing High Minimum Wages Kill Jobs, Explained.”You might wonder why incessantly quoted studies from liberal “nonpartisan” groups that falsely predicted minimum wages wouldn’t hurt cities aren’t “controversial.”Because if you want to raise the minimum wage, you will raise the price of labor and often reduce the amount of labor that’s going to be hired.That’s the trade-off.For decades, most economists agreed.While most economists I’ve known are relatively humble about forecasting, the ones who aren’t get most of the press.“Out of 42 Top Economists, Only 1 Believes the GOP Tax Bills Would Help the Economy,” a November Vox headline read. There are thousands of unknowns that can’t be quantified or computed, including human nature.But after decades of using data to help us think about goods, services, jobs, consumption and our choices, “economists say” is now used to coat liberal policy positions with a veneer of scientific certitude.And since Democrats began successfully aligning economics with social engineering, we’ve stopped seriously talking about the tradeoffs of regulations.A good example of this trend is the push for a $15 minimum wage — an emotionally satisfying, popular and destructive policy idea.Most cities that have passed the hike have experienced job losses.When researchers at the University of Washington studied Seattle’s $15 minimum-wage hike, one of the largest in the nation, they found that thousands of fewer jobs were created and thousands of people lost hours of work, making them poorer.No doubt a lot of people were surprised.last_img read more

Brazil virus toll surges to third-highest in world

first_imgThe far-right leader has urged businesses to wage “war” on state governors who order business closures, arguing they are needlessly hurting Latin America’s biggest economy. Experts say under-testing in Brazil means the real numbers are probably much higher.The latest figures underlined the grim toll the virus is taking in Latin America, the latest epicenter in the pandemic.Brazil, a country of 210 million people, has been the hardest-hit in the region.President Jair Bolsonaro has fiercely criticized coronavirus stay-at-home measures, even as the number of infections and deaths continues to soar. Brazil’s death toll from the novel coronavirus has surged past 34,000 to become the third-highest in the world, surpassing Italy’s, according to official figures released Thursday.The South American country reported a new record of 1,473 deaths in 24 hours, bringing its overall toll to 34,021, behind only the United States and Britain.Brazil has now confirmed 614,941 infections, the health ministry said — the second-largest caseload in the world, behind the US.center_img Topics :last_img read more

4 Garrison Officers Mess Squash Club wins big on World Squash Day

first_imgThe 4 Garrison Officers Mess Squash Club in Kumasi commemorated this year’s World Squash Day with a comprehensive win over their counterparts from the AGA club  from Obuasi.The one day event saw the host club win 6 matches against 3 for their opponents.The first two matches of the morning went either way paving the way for an uncompromising competition.But with the crowd behind them as host, players of the 4 Garrison team turned the heat on their opponents with some great display of skills and stamina to win the next three matches.The likes of Captain Francis Coffie, Eric Mensah and K.O Prempeh were in their elements winning the various matches with ease.Captain of the club,  Francis Coffie indicated  later in an interview the club is on a mission to introduce the youth of the Ashanti Region to the game of squash. “With a pre-fabricated squash court, we intend to carry the game to our various senior high schools to give the young ones the opportunity to appreciate and embrace the game. Unfortunately it is only Achimota School that has a squash court and that has to change for the better.”Francis Coffie however encouraged the public to take the game seriously since it reduces the risk of cardio diseases, especially among people with sedentary life styles.last_img read more