Spain leaves out Diego Costa

first_imgMADRID (AP):Diego Costa has been left out of the Spain squad because of an injury, coach Vicente del Bosque said yesterday. Del Bosque announced his squad for upcoming friendlies against Italy and Romania.”Diego came off from a match with an injury in his quadriceps muscle, but four days later, because Chelsea had much at stake, he was made to play again and finished in some pain,” del Bosque said. “Although the doctors said he was getting better, we have opted not to include him.”Last Saturday, Costa was sent off in Chelsea’s FA Cup loss to Everton for “improper conduct”. He was given a second yellow card after thrusting his head towards Gareth Barry before appearing to make a biting motion on the side of the midfielder’s neck. Both players later said there was no bite.Del Bosque said Costa’s behaviour was not a cause of concern.”There are two months to go before I choose my final squad for the European Championship and absolutely no one – not even Diego Costa – is currently excluded,” Del Bosque said.Costa’s place in attack was taken by Aritz Aduriz, who scored a hat-trick in Athletic Bilbao’s 4-1 win over Deportivo La Coruna and then clinched his team’s Europa League win with an away goal against Valencia.De Bosque said playmaker Andres Iniesta had also been left out because of a muscle problem.”He had discomfort and we considered it appropriate not to include him,” Del Bosque said.last_img read more

49ers Richard Sherman on Russell Wilson: ‘I’ve seen him throw 5 picks’

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile deviceSANTA CLARA — You just knew cornerback Richard Sherman could find a way to spice up Sunday’s return to Seattle, his home the previous seven seasons before defecting to the 49ers this year.First off, Sherman didn’t berate Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson the way he famously did former 49ers Michael Crabtree and Colin Kaepernick five years ago. But Sherman sure wasn’t offering praise Thursday about Wilson’s …last_img read more

Jeeps of joy

first_imgSreeraj Unnithan with his vintage jeepFlaunting their ageless charm and beauty, the jeeps of the bygone era are attracting Bangloreans. People here have always had a penchant for the old and rugged, but over the years new age machines and style has taken over substance, at least on the roads.,Sreeraj Unnithan with his vintage jeepFlaunting their ageless charm and beauty, the jeeps of the bygone era are attracting Bangloreans. People here have always had a penchant for the old and rugged, but over the years new age machines and style has taken over substance, at least on the roads. The last few years have seen that change with both youngsters and well as older and more experienced riders looking for, and taking pride in these tough machines that have weathered many storms.Agreed, the rugged CJs and Willys do not fit into definitions of conventional stunners. They lack the sensuous curves and sleek styling that the world drools over. But these vehicles were made for fighting battles. Like generals during war, they earn their spurs through sheer grit and passion, braving the storm without as much as a dent. They command a presence that is impossible to ignore. “I love the what-you-see-is-what-you-get honesty they exude,” says Sreeraj Unnithan, 34, a team leader in a software firm. “Look a jeep in the eye and you know it means business,” he adds.Suresh Kumar SP, 48-year-old senior scientist with the Defence Research & Development Organisation, stumbled upon his CJ 340 by accident. A free-spirited biker and nature lover, he chanced upon a stray entry in the local classifieds that offered security on four wheels minus the confinement that comes bundled with it. “I jumped at this best-of-both-worlds offer,” he says.But Kumar was lucky. These elusive vehicles don’t come so easy. They can’t be picked off showroom shelves and most enthusiasts either import or buy them from old garages and army disposal auctions. “You can choose to showcase them but these blue-blooded warriors are meant to rule the road,” says Rajesh Narayanan, clarifying that ‘vintage’ does not reflect snob value. Many of these vehicles are close to three decades old, and some date back much earlier.advertisementTextbook trivia goes that when Bantam introduced the first prototype during World War II, enamoured American soldiers informally christened the jeep after the popular cartoon character Eugene, Popeye’s jungle pet. And this was because; it was small, able to move between dimensions and could solve seemingly impossible problems. ‘Small’ is a subjective term, but the rest holds true to the many individuals who push these gentle beasts to the limit. Offroading or all-terrain riding, is a major draw to jeep communities across the country. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not always a ‘guy thing.’Rajesh Narayanan and Jayakrishnan MSapna Gurukar, 31, does not feel women look at offroading any differently from men. Drawn to the wheel watching husband Chandan in a few early tournaments, she confesses to being hooked by the sport. “You aren’t a speed devil on these tournaments, just a careful driver. That works perfectly for me,” she says. And the encouragement she has received from the word ‘go’ has been heartening. “I love the expressions on some of the men’s faces as they watch a woman step out of the macho machine. It’s a strange mix of incredulity and admiration,” she quips.Though from a distance they all seem alike-a hazy blur in military colours-owners believe each vehicle has a distinct personality. Jayakrishnan M, 34, a HR professional, calls his CJ 3B ‘Dwarf’. “It’s short-shafted, deceptively docile, and can surprise you with its temper,” he says. The other names are equally evocative. ‘Spidey’ crosses any obstacle in his path and ‘Gajini’ has inscriptions carved on his muscular frame.Buying one sets you back only by as little as two to three lakhs, but that’s just a fraction of the expense that goes into maintaining it. Very few mechanics are trained to handle breakdowns and spares, if available, come at steep prices. “On a lighter vein, if ‘jeep’ was an abbreviation, just empty every pocket wouldn’t be a bad option,” says Jayakrishnan.Despite the challenges, the thrills of a ride are incomparable. In some cases, functional modifications are made to make them slightly more comfortable, but don’t expect cushy leather upholstery or frilly makeovers. These are real men. Meant for the tough at heart. Once you step on it, life is never the same again. And who dares disagree. Vintage triviaCommon Vintage Military Models: Ford GPW,Willys MB,CJ2A,CJ3A.Willys: Willys built the first civilian Jeeps (CJ) soon after World War II.CJ 3B: This model has the maximum sale around the world. Close to 5,00,000 across companies worldwide.Cost of vinatge jeeps: Rs 3,00,000 lakhs.Cost of older models: Older models like the Ford GPWand Willys MB may fetch more than Rs 5,00,000 lakhs.Common Indian models: MM540 and MM550XD (Military).advertisementlast_img read more

Innovations and Opportunities to Achieve MDG 5: View the Live Stream Today!

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 14, 2010August 17, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Marie Stopes International and EngenderHealth invite you to view a panel discussion entitled, “Innovations and Opportunities to Achieve MDG 5”. Panelists include Pam Barnes (President, EngenderHealth), Michael Holscher (Senior VP, Marie Stopes), Monica Greene (Clinical Director, Marie Stopes) and Wendy Trumbull (Director of International Advocacy, (Population Action International).Join us for this session in the lead-up to the UN General Assembly Special Session. Key opportunities and challenges in scaling up family planning and reproductive health services are explored. View the live streaming video today at 2:30pm EST here.For more information go to www.engenderhealth.orgShare this:last_img read more

Australian squads in camp this weekend

first_imgThe Australian Men’s and Women’s squads will train in Sydney this weekend as they commence the new cycle in the lead up to the 2016 Trans Tasman Series. The squads will train together for the first time since their 2015 Touch World Cup wins in May last year, with the Mixed Open squad to train next weekend. The athletes have a busy start to 2016, with several playing in the TFA All Stars match in a fortnight, as well as the 2016 Harvey Norman National Touch League in March followed by the 2016 Trans Tasman Series in late April in Auckland. Stay tuned to the Touch Football Australia website and social media channels over the weekend for updates and contributions from our Camp Correspondents, as well as Tour Diaries next week:Website – www.touchfootball.com.auFacebook – www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustraliaTwitter – www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus Instagram – www.instagram.com/touchfootballaustralia  Related LinksAussies in Camplast_img read more

USC research could lay foundation for a vaccine against tickborne virus

first_img Source:https://news.usc.edu/153450/usc-asian-longhorned-tick-sfts/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 7 2019Two groundbreaking discoveries by USC researchers could lead to medications and a vaccine to treat or prevent a hemorrhagic fever transmitted by a new tick species before it spreads across the United States.In the Jan. 7 Nature Microbiology, researchers describe the molecular mechanisms used by the virus to infect and sicken humans, a puzzle that has stumped scientists since the disease emerged in rural China in 2009.In a related discovery published in Nature Microbiology last month, researchers at USC and in Korea found that aged ferrets with the virus exhibit symptoms similar to those seen in older humans, while young ferrets show no clinical symptoms. An animal model in which to study the virus, a crucial tool in vaccine or drug discovery, has been elusive, until now.”The ticks are already in the United States. If they start spreading the virus, it will be a major problem,” said Jae Jung, the study’s senior author and chair of the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. “I started studying this virus five years ago because once it appeared in China, I knew it would eventually appear in the United States.”The findings come at a time when health officials are increasingly concerned about the growing danger of tick-borne illnesses. In the United States, Lyme disease accounts for most cases, but other illnesses are on the rise. The total number of reported cases has more than doubled in the past 13 years, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.The new threat comes in the form of a bug new to North America — the Asian longhorned tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis. It’s a tiny, parasitic arachnid that’s a major livestock pest in East and Central Asia, where it thrives under temperate conditions. After a blood meal, females drop off their host to produce 2,000 eggs at a time, with or without the help of a male.It can transmit severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS), an illness that causes nausea, diarrhea and muscle pain. The illness is often lethal, killing up to 30 percent of hospitalized patients. The virus depletes blood platelets as it replicates, which prevents clotting and leads to hemorrhage similar to Ebola virus infection.Related StoriesHPV vaccine has led to a dramatic reduction in cervical cancer rates, but Africa is lagging behindAustralia leads the world in childhood immunization coverageCommon cold virus strain could be a breakthrough in bladder cancer treatmentThe disease has spread to Japan and Korea since it appeared in China. The SFTS virus has not been detected in the United States yet, but the Asian longhorned tick was found in nine states during the past two years, including Arkansas, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.The CDC considers the presence of the Asian longhorned tick in the United States an “emerging disease threat” and is recommending ongoing surveillance efforts and testing for pathogens. A virus genetically similar to SFTS virus, Heartland virus, and causing similar human illness was also recently discovered in the United States. Globally, the SFTS disease has caused infection of thousands of people a year in China.Jung and his colleagues found that the virus targets a gene called TPL2, which is involved in the body’s inflammatory response. In a healthy person, the body’s natural inflammatory response helps fight off an infection. With SFTS infection, the virus directs the TPL2 gene to switch off that protective inflammatory response at the site of the tick bite – creating a protected spot in which the virus can amass copies of itself and spread throughout the body.In animals, the researchers disabled TPL2 with an inhibitor; as a result, the body’s healthy immune function kept viral replication in check, resulting in a milder infection – and suggesting that the TPL2 gene’s signaling pathway presents a potential target for a therapy.”We’re very optimistic that these findings will help us get a vaccine up and running within several years,” said Younho Choi, a post-doctoral researcher in the Jung lab and the study’s first author. “We’re already developing various vaccine candidates in mouse and ferret animal models. The idea behind the vaccine is to outsmart the virus by putting a roadblock, allowing the body’s immune system to keep doing its job.”last_img read more

Watchdogs cite lax medical and mental health treatment of ICE detainees

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 15 2019It’s Saturday morning and the women of the Contreras family are busy in Montclair, Calif., making pupusas, tamales and tacos. They’re working to replace the income of José Contreras, who has been held since last June at Southern California’s Adelanto ICE Processing Center, a privately run immigration detention center.José’s daughter, Giselle, drives around in an aging minivan collecting food orders. First a hospital, then a car wash, then a local bank.Giselle’s father crossed illegally from Guatemala more than two decades ago. He worked in construction until agents picked him up and brought him to Adelanto. José languished there for three months without his diabetes medication, Giselle said. Now, she said, the guards give it to him at odd times during the day and night. And ICE agents took his eyeglasses so he can’t read legal documents or write letters, she said.”My aunt tried to take in glasses for him, but they don’t allow for us to give them anything,” Giselle said, steering the minivan. “They tell us that they give them everything they need.” But as to reclaiming his glasses, “No. … He doesn’t have glasses.”Giselle said that her 60-year-old father is terrified of being deported, and that the regimented world inside Adelanto is driving him into a deep depression.”His conversations now have become shorter,” she said. “He doesn’t talk to us and ask, ‘How’s your day? How you been?’ He’s always looking down at the ground; he doesn’t want to make eye contact for the same reason that he’s so depressed.”Jose’s sister, Maria Contreras, visits her brother every Saturday. She has urged him to see a psychologist at Adelanto, but he tells her that even though he filled out a medical request, he doesn’t get any help. “No response, or anything,” Maria said.Adelanto sits on a desolate stretch of road in the high desert about an hour north of the city of Riverside. Nearly 2,000 men and women are held here. Some arrived recently during the surge in border crossings. Others lived in the U.S. — undocumented and undetected — for years. In the visiting room, where detainees are brought in wearing blue, orange or red baggy pants and tops, a sign on the wall reads, “Don’t give up hope.”The facility — run by a federal contractor, the GEO Group, a for-profit company based in Boca Raton, Fla., that runs private prisons — has a troubled past. During an unannounced visit last year, federal inspectors from the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of the Inspector General found “nooses” made out of bed sheets in 15 out of 20 cells. The inspectors found guards overlooked the nooses even though a detainee had committed suicide using a bedsheet in 2017 and several others had attempted suicide using a similar method. The government audit concluded GEO Group guards improperly handcuffed and shackled detainees, unnecessarily placed detainees in solitary confinement and failed to provide adequate medical care.A separate investigation of Adelanto and other immigration detention facilities in California released in February by California Attorney General Xavier Becerra found similar health and safety problems and concluded that detainees were treated like prisoners, some kept in their cells for 22 hours a day, even though they have not been charged with a crime. A state law passed in 2017 directs the state to inspect and report on the treatment of immigrant detainees held in California.The alleged cases documented in the most recent report by Disability Rights California, a watchdog group with legal oversight to protect people with disabilities in the Golden State, are grim: detainees slitting their wrists; discontinued medication for depression; and ignored requests for wheelchairs and walkers. At least one detainee claimed that guards pepper-sprayed him when he did not stand up, and a second time while he tried to hang himself.Related StoriesParticipation in local food projects may have positive effect on healthCombat veterans more likely to exhibit signs of depression, anxiety in later lifeResearchers set out to define recommended ‘dosage’ of work for optimal wellbeingIn a written statement, the GEO Group said it “strongly disputes the claims” in the report, and that the remedies recommended by Disability Rights California “were already in place.””We are deeply committed,” the company said, “to delivering high-quality, culturally responsive services in safe and humane environments.” An ICE spokesperson said, in an emailed statement, that the GEO Group’s Adelanto facility is in “full compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.”But Mario, who was inside Adelanto for six months in 2018, said the report describes his own experiences there.”What’s happening is all those claims that have been made against GEO and the staff in the medical department are finally being backed up by reports,” Mario said.He requested his last name be withheld because he’s out on bond and still fighting deportation. Mario is now 32; he crossed the border illegally with his parents when he was 5.In 2017, he was convicted of a misdemeanor and ICE agents picked him up at his home in Ontario, Calif. At the time, Mario was seeing a therapist for depression and taking medication. It took three weeks to get back on antidepressants, he said, and the sessions with the psychologists at Adelanto were only cursory.”They keep their actual sessions to five to 10 minutes,” he said. “It’s basically like a quick check-in. They just ask you, ‘How are you? Do you have any suicidal thoughts? When is your next court date?’ It’s one of those things that I feel is basically done just to say, ‘All right, we did it.’”Mario is gay and lived in a room with three other men, including a gay man from Mexico who was seeking asylum. The two became close friends.”He was persecuted in Mexico because of being gay,” Mario said. Months of detention “and not getting any mental health care really took a toll on him. And that’s when he cut himself. He cut his wrist with a razor blade that we get to shave. And after that he was placed in solitary confinement for about a week.”Mario said when his friend came back to their room, he was taking some sort of medication.”After that, all he did was sleep,” Mario said. “When the food was ready I’d go call him: ‘OK, it’s time to eat.'”Other detainees and immigration lawyers described a similar pattern, of GEO psychiatrists prescribing antipsychotic medications that make people sleep much of the time. It’s one of the reasons people were reluctant to seek help, Mario said. But also, like other detainees, he was worried about being labeled as depressed.”I couldn’t express whenever I was feeling extremely sad or depressed or anxious because I was afraid that would be used against me in court,” he explained.Judges cannot use mental health conditions to deny legal status to a detainee, according to immigration attorneys.Although the GEO Group said any problems detailed in the Disability Rights California report had long been addressed, last month detainees in Adelanto staged a hunger strike. The detainees gave an attorney a handwritten note, which was released by the Inland Coalition for Immigrant Justice, an advocacy group.Chief among their demands was speedier access to good medical care.last_img read more

Boeing apologizes for Max crashes as Airbus rakes in sales

first_img A French Army Eurocopter Tiger helicopter performs during the inauguration the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France, Monday June 17, 2019. The world’s aviation elite are gathering at the Paris Air Show with safety concerns on many minds after two crashes of the popular Boeing 737 Max. (Benoit Tessier/Pool via AP) Boeing executives apologized Monday to airlines and families of victims of 737 Max crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia, as the U.S. plane maker struggles to regain the trust of regulators, pilots and the global traveling public. Citation: Boeing apologizes for Max crashes as Airbus rakes in sales (2019, June 17) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-boeing-max-renewed.html French President Emmanuel Macron, center, French Defense Minister Florence Parly, left, and Eric Trappier, Chairman and CEO of Dassault Aviation, attend the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France, Monday June 17, 2019. The world’s aviation elite are gathering at the Paris Air Show with safety concerns on many minds after two crashes of the popular Boeing 737 Max. (Benoit Tessier/Pool via AP) A French Army Eurocopter Tiger helicopter performs during the inauguration the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France, Monday June 17, 2019. The world’s aviation elite are gathering at the Paris Air Show with safety concerns on many minds after two crashes of the popular Boeing 737 Max. (Benoit Tessier/Pool via AP) An Airbus A330neo aircraft performs during the inauguration the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France, Monday June 17, 2019. The world’s aviation elite are gathering at the Paris Air Show with safety concerns on many minds after two crashes of the popular Boeing 737 Max. (Benoit Tessier/Pool via AP) French President Emmanuel Macron, center, French Defense Minister Florence Parly, left, and Eric Trappier, Chairman and CEO of Dassault Aviation, attend the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France, Monday June 17, 2019. The world’s aviation elite are gathering at the Paris Air Show with safety concerns on many minds after two crashes of the popular Boeing 737 Max. (Benoit Tessier/Pool via AP) “Now they have apologized,” said Ningsi Ayorbaba, a mother of three whose husband Paul Ferdinand Ayorbaba was killed in the Lion Air crash. “I hope this is a good signal” for families like hers that have filed lawsuits against Boeing.”No amount of money can bring my loved one back, but I want Boeing to be more transparent in the compensation process for the sake of the children” of victims left behind, she told The Associated Press.Indonesia’s Transportation Ministry spokesman, Hengki Angkasawan, said his government needs “transparent work of the aircraft maker to fix the problem.”Boeing has acknowledged botched communication with regulators over a cockpit warning system in the 737 Max, and is promising more transparency about its promised fix. Explore further Alpha jets from the French Air Force Patrouille de France fly during the inauguration the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France, Monday June 17, 2019. The world’s aviation elite are gathering at the Paris Air Show with safety concerns on many minds after two crashes of the popular Boeing 737 Max. (Benoit Tessier/Pool via AP) CEO: Boeing made mistake in handling warning-system problemcenter_img Right after the launch, the Los Angeles-based Air Lease Corporation signed a letter of intent to buy 27 of the new Airbus planes.That’s a new challenge for Boeing, which said Monday it is still working on plans for a possible jet in the same category—dubbed New Midsize Airplane, or NMA. It would fill a gap in the Boeing lineup between the smaller 737 and the larger 777 and 787.The air show also hosted the kickoff of a joint European fighter jet, and is seeing a growing focus on electric planes and other planet-friendly technology. Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde Gebremariam said only that Boeing’s apology “is consistent with our opinion.”An Ethiopian who lost her younger brother in the Ethiopian Airlines crash said Boeing’s apology is not enough to return lost loved ones, and expressed concern about Boeing’s push to return the 737 Max to the skies. French President Emmanuel Macron, center, French Defense Minister Florence Parly, left, and Eric Trappier, Chairman and CEO of Dassault Aviation, attend the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France, Monday June 17, 2019. The world’s aviation elite are gathering at the Paris Air Show with safety concerns on many minds after two crashes of the popular Boeing 737 Max. (Benoit Tessier/Pool via AP) In addition to safety concerns, the global economic slowdown and trade tensions are weighing on the mood at the air show.Boeing announced only lackluster orders at the start of the show, while rival Airbus announced a bevy of new sales and launched a new long-range single-aisle jet, beating Boeing to a market that both aviation giants predict will grow.In the biggest new plane announcement expected at Le Bourget, Airbus formally launched its long-range A321XLR. The plane should will be ready for customers in 2023 and be able to fly up to 4,700 nautical miles.Chief salesman Christian Scherer wouldn’t say how much the plane would cost to develop. Some victims’ families welcomed Boeing’s gesture. Others called it too little, too late.Boeing was in a visibly contrite mood at the opening of the Paris Air Show, where safety was on many minds as the global aviation elite gathered to showcase and trade cutting-edge, costly technology.”We are very sorry for the loss of lives” in the Lion Air crash in October and Ethiopian Airlines crash in March, Kevin McAllister, CEO of Boeing’s commercial aircraft, told reporters. A total of 346 people were killed in the disasters.McAllister also said “I’m sorry for the disruption” to airlines from the subsequent grounding of all Max planes worldwide, and to their passengers facing summer travel disruptions.Boeing executives defended improvements to Max software that has been implicated in the crashes, but couldn’t predict when the plane could fly again.Investigations are underway into what happened, though it’s known that angle-measuring sensors in both planes malfunctioned, alerting anti-stall software to push the noses of the planes down. The pilots were unable to take back control of the planes. The Max is crucial to Boeing’s future. It is the newest version of Boeing’s best-selling plane, and was a direct response to Airbus’ fuel-efficient A320neo. Customers like the fuel efficiency because it saves money and helps them respond to growing public and regulatory pressure to reduce emissions. But Airbus has outpaced Boeing in selling planes in this category.With many of its airline customers and suppliers at the air show, Boeing repeatedly insisted it is focusing on getting the Max re-certified and speeding up production of the planes. © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. French President Emmanuel Macron disembarks from an Airbus A330 MRTT to attend the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France, Monday June 17, 2019. The world’s aviation elite are gathering at the Paris Air Show with safety concerns on many minds after two crashes of the popular Boeing 737 Max. (Benoit Tessier/Pool via AP) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more