Avian flu virus infected civets in Vietnam

first_imgAug 26, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Reports today said three rare palm civets that recently died in captivity in Vietnam were infected with an H5N1 avian influenza virus, adding another species to the list of those susceptible to the pathogen.The three Owston’s palm civets died in June, and tests of samples in a Hong Kong laboratory detected the H5N1 virus, according to Reuters and Agence France-Presse (AFP) reports. The animals died in the same cage in Cuc Phuong National Park, about 55 miles south of Hanoi.Staff members at the park said no other animals or people had fallen ill.In addition to birds and humans, H5N1 viruses have been known to infect pigs, housecats, tigers, and leopards. The virus has killed millions of poultry and at least 57 people in outbreaks in Asia since late 2003.Civets figured in another relatively new infectious disease: SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome). Chinese scientists concluded that masked palm civets—a different species from Owston’s—were the main animal source of the SARS virus, which infected about 8,000 people around the world in 2003. Civets are used for food in southern China.The civets that died of avian flu were a female and two offspring, all of which had been born in captivity, reports said. It was not clear how they became infected.Reuters quoted Do Van Lap, a manager at the park, as saying, “How they were infected remains unknown as they were raised together with 20 other civets, their cages close to each other, but the remaining civets are strong.”Lap said initial suspicion fell on park staff members who lived in a village where some chickens had died, but tests did not find the virus. He said the civets were not fed chicken.The story said Cuc Phuong National Park has a wildlife protection project that involves raising peacocks, pheasants, freshwater turtles, and deer in captivity, as well as civets. “All the remaining animals are safe, so we reckon the three civets are isolated cases,” Lap told Reuters.In an Associated Press (AP) report, Scott Robertson, technical adviser for the civet conservation program at the park, commented, “It’s another good example of how dangerous this thing [the H5N1 virus] is.” He said the WHO and Vietnamese health officials were expected to test park employees.Peter Horby, a WHO epidemiologist in Hanoi, said the finding does not signal an increased risk of avian flu in humans, since people have less contact with civets than with poultry, according to the AP. Poultry have been the source of nearly all human cases so far.Owston’s palm civet is an endangered species that is confined to parts of northern Vietnam, northern Laos, and neighboring areas of China, according to a report from Vietnam’s National Center for Scientific Research.Also in Vietnam, a pilot program to vaccinate poultry against avian flu in two provinces is running behind schedule, according to a report today from the Vietnam News Agency. About 72% of targeted birds in the northern province of Nam Dinh have been vaccinated, but only 38% have been vaccinated in Tien Giang province in the south, where flooding has caused problems, the story said.In other developments, officials in Finland reported a possible avian flu outbreak in seagulls, but it was probably not a highly pathogenic strain, according to a Reuters report today.A flu virus was found in sick and dead seagulls in the northern town of Oulou, the report said, but the strain was not identified. Finland shares a border with Russia, where H5N1 avian flu has surfaced in poultry in recent weeks, but not in areas near Finland.See also:CIDRAP Overview: Avian influenza: agricultural and wildlife considerationslast_img read more

Chinese club gives Ighalo conditions for continued Man U stay

first_imgRelatedPosts Ighalo: My best moment as ‘Red Devil’ EPL: Crystal Palace stun sloppy Man U EPL: Red Devils attack Palace Shanghai Shenhua is reportedly happy to allow Odion Ighalo to remain at Manchester United until January, but only if he signs a new two-year deal with them.Ighalo arrived at Old Trafford on a short-term loan deal in January, and despite the season not yet finishing due to the coronavirus, his contract is due to expire on Sunday. Talks are ongoing over whether he will remain in England or leave to head back to China, but Sky Sports are reporting that his parent club have come up with a solution.It has been reported that Shanghai Shenhua will allow Ighalo’s loan deal to be extended as far as January, but only if the player ties down his future in China until 2024 in a deal worth £400,000 a week.The striker is currently under contract until 2022 in Shanghai but the club are desperate to top his deal up with a further two years before they allow him to stay – and potentially impress – in the Premier League.Ighalo has only started three games for United – making a further five appearances off the bench – but already has four goals to his name.With his contract currently ending this weekend, there is some confusion over where he goes next, with reports earlier in the week claiming he would be unable to return to China until October. It was stated that travel restrictions on foreigners returning to China – which includes around a third of Chinese Super League footballers – could remain in place for months to come, despite the new season starting in June.Shanghai Shenhua is believed to be ready to bring in a short-term replacement for Ighalo should he not be able to return, giving Manchester United a boost in their attacking department for the coming months.Tags: ChinaManchester UnitedOdion IghaloOld Traffordlast_img read more

Win a prize in the pet selfie competition

first_imgClick to receive news links via WhatsApp. Or  for the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there! There are prizes up for grabs if you enter our #PETSELFIE competition.To enter is simple:Email us the best picture you have with your pet to nameeras@dbn.caxton.co.zaThis must be done before April 27, 2018.The voting stage will commence with photos being uploaded to our Facebook page and the selfie with the most ‘likes’ wins!(In order for your vote to count, you must first ‘like’ our Facebook page before ‘liking’ any of the contestants’ selfies)All you animal lovers now have the chance to show off your pets by simply snapping a selfie with them! WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite last_img read more