City limits

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Park life

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Anti-social

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Sworn to Belfast

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Quintain’s NAV soars after bumper year…

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Israel strikes Hamas targets after new Gaza rocket fire

first_imgIsraeli aircraft struck Hamas targets in the Gaza Strip early Friday in response to new rocket fire from the blockaded territory, the army said.Three rockets were fired at Israel overnight without causing any casualties. Two were intercepted by air defences, a statement said.Israel swiftly retaliated against Hamas, the Islamist movement which rules Gaza and which Israel generally holds responsible for all rocket fire from the territory, regardless of who launches it. The military struck “Hamas targets in the south of the Gaza Strip”, the army said.Israel has deployed additional troops to the Gaza border area since US President Donald Trump unveiled a controversial new peace plan on Tuesday that was angrily rejected by the Palestinians.One rocket was fired from Gaza on Wednesday evening, again drawing retaliatory strikes against Hamas targets in the south of Gaza.Hamas has over the past year gradually shaped an informal truce with Israel, under which the Jewish state has slightly eased its crippling blockade of the enclave in exchange for calm.But Israel in November assassinated a senior leader of the Islamic Jihad militant group in Gaza, sparking a flare-up in which 36 Palestinians were killed. No Israelis died.Over two days, Islamic Jihad fired some 450 rockets towards Israel, which unusually largely confined its reprisals to Hamas’s more radical ally.Topics :last_img read more

US to deploy Navy ships closer to Venezuela: Sources

first_imgOn Tuesday, however, The Trump administration offered to begin lifting Venezuela sanctions if the opposition and members of Maduro’s Socialist Party form an interim government without him, marking a shift in a US policy that has failed to end his grip on power.The naval deployment is intended to ratchet up pressure on Maduro and his allies but is not a prelude to US military action against Venezuela, one person familiar with the matter said.Although President Donald Trump has insisted that all options are on the table against Muduro, US officials have made clear there is little appetite for military force, which could entangle the United States in another foreign conflict.The deployment plan calls for the US Southern Command to move several Navy vessels toward Venezuela, according to one source familiar with the matter. But the sources said it was unclear how close they would get to the Venezuelan coast.Admiral Craig Faller, head of US Southern Command, told a Pentagon briefing earlier in March that there would be an increased US military presence in the hemisphere to counter narco-trafficking.Some US officials have privately said Trump was increasingly frustrated with the results of his Venezuela policy.The United States and dozens of other countries have recognized opposition leader Juan Guaido as Venezuela’s legitimate president, regarding Maduro’s 2018 re-election as a sham. But Maduro has remained in power, backed by the country’s military and by Russia, China and Cuba.Topics : The Trump administration is deploying US Navy ships closer to Venezuela to beef up anti-drug efforts following a US drug trafficking indictment against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, according to a US official and two other people familiar with the matter.The US government is expected on Wednesday to announce the start of the enhanced drug interdiction mission in the Caribbean, the sources said on Wednesday, speaking on condition of anonymity.It follows the indictment last week of Maduro and more than a dozen current and former officials on charges of narco-terrorism and drug trafficking, part of the Trump administration’s pressure campaign aimed at ousting the socialist leader.last_img read more

Brazil virus toll surges to third-highest in world

first_imgThe far-right leader has urged businesses to wage “war” on state governors who order business closures, arguing they are needlessly hurting Latin America’s biggest economy. Experts say under-testing in Brazil means the real numbers are probably much higher.The latest figures underlined the grim toll the virus is taking in Latin America, the latest epicenter in the pandemic.Brazil, a country of 210 million people, has been the hardest-hit in the region.President Jair Bolsonaro has fiercely criticized coronavirus stay-at-home measures, even as the number of infections and deaths continues to soar. Brazil’s death toll from the novel coronavirus has surged past 34,000 to become the third-highest in the world, surpassing Italy’s, according to official figures released Thursday.The South American country reported a new record of 1,473 deaths in 24 hours, bringing its overall toll to 34,021, behind only the United States and Britain.Brazil has now confirmed 614,941 infections, the health ministry said — the second-largest caseload in the world, behind the US.center_img Topics :last_img read more

UN warns COVID-19 could wipe out gains in equality for women at work

first_imgThe ILO said women were also in greater danger of infection, and less likely to have social security coverage, as they make up the vast majority of domestic, health and social care workers globally who could lose jobs due to coronavirus lockdowns.”The latest labor force survey data reveal alarming trends that threaten to exacerbate existing disparities and eliminate the modest gains achieved in recent years in terms of gender equality in the labor market,” the ILO said in a report.”In contrast to previous crises, women’s employment is at greater risk than men’s, particularly owing to the impact of the downturn on the service sector.”The ILO added that the unequal distribution of unpaid care work has also worsened during the pandemic, exacerbated by the closure of schools and care services. Nine out of 10 students are out of school worldwide, according to an April study by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, a UN agency.Women with children now spend an average 65 hours a week on the unpaid chores – nearly a third more than fathers – according to the Boston Consulting Group, which questioned parents in five countries.Achieving gender equality by 2030 was one of the global goals adopted by the United Nations in 2015 to tackle social ills like poverty and conflict.Previous reports had shown that gender gaps in labor force participation rates had narrowed slightly in recent decades but the gap was still estimated at 27 percentage points in 2019.The latest ILO report showed that the proportion of women working in hard-hit sectors was particularly high in Central America at 58.9%, in South-East Asia at 48.5%, Southern Europe at 45.8% and South America at 45.5%.”The bigger their losses in employment during the lockdown phase and the greater the scarcity of jobs in the aftermath of the COVID-19 crisis, the harder it will be for women’s employment to recover,” the ILO said.”This crisis therefore threatens to nullify women’s gains in the labor market along with the positive [albeit slow] changes in the distribution of unpaid care work.”  The coronavirus pandemic could wipe out “the modest progress” made on gender equality at work in recent decades with women globally at greater risk of losing their jobs, the International Labor Organization (ILO) warned on Tuesday.The UN agency said the fall in global working hours was “significantly worse than previously estimated” in the first half of the year. The Americas was the hardest-hit region.But it warned women were disproportionately affected, with almost 510 million women, or 40% of all employed women, working in the industries with most job losses compared to 36.6% of men, which includes food and accommodation, retail and real estate.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Former intel head elected as acting Indonesian track and field chief

first_imgSecretary-general Tigor Tanjung acknowledged that the absence of a chief figure would hamper the funding disbursement process from the government to the association in relation to athletes’ preparations and training programs for the Olympics.“We are going to organize a national training camp in the immediate future. Thus, Zacky’s presence is pivotal for the association as we are going to need government funding to run those programs,” Tigor said as quoted in the association’s statement on Thursday.Commenting on his new position, Zacky acknowledged that this time is very crucial for the association as they are being asked to maintain a top performance in the middle of a funding deficit and tournament postponements.“Despite the problems, we are going to move forward with our planned schedules,” Zacky, brother of one of the country’s most senior lawyers, Nono Anwar Makarim, said.Sprinter Lalu Muhammad Zohri is the only Indonesian athlete to secure his place at the Olympics, thanks to his 10.03-second achievement in the 2019 Seiko Golden Grand Prix in Osaka, Japan, last year. The World Athletics body previously announced that the Tokyo Olympics qualifiers would be postponed from April to December this year.Topics : Former head of Indonesian military intelligence Maj. Gen. (ret) Zacky Anwar Makarim, 72, has been elected as acting Indonesian track and field association chief, replacing Muhammad “Bob” Hasan who died earlier this year.Zacky, who is a senior member of the association, was elected unanimously by a panel of the association’s top members. Uncle of current education minister Nadiem Makarim, Zacky is tasked with continuing Bob Hasan’s legacy and safeguarding athletes’ preparations for next year’s Tokyo Olympics and also other competitions, at least until the association’s current board completes its term in December.The association is set to appoint a new permanent chief and members of management in December through a congress.last_img read more