Dean to retire

first_imgBy Larry DendyUniversity of GeorgiaGale A. Buchanan, dean and director of the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences since 1995,will step down at the end of this year and will retire from theuniversity in 2005.His departure will close out a 40-year education, research andadministration career at two land-grant universities. He willstep down as dean and director on Dec. 31 but will remain on thefaculty through spring semester. His retirement is effectiveApril 30, 2005.”Gale Buchanan has served the College of Agricultural andEnvironmental Sciences with vigor, determination and a clearsense of both this state’s proud agricultural heritage and thefuture of agricultural education,” said UGA President Michael F.Adams. “The University of Georgia and the entire state havebenefitted from his leadership. He will be greatly missed.” Came to UGA in 1986Buchanan, an agronomist in weed science, joined UGA in 1986 asassociate director of the Georgia Agricultural ExperimentStations and resident director of the UGA Coastal PlainExperiment Station in Tifton. He was interim director of theexperiment stations for a year before becoming dean.On the Auburn University faculty for 20 years, he was dean anddirector of the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station from 1980until 1985.Arnett Mace, UGA senior vice president for academic affairs andprovost, said a national search for Buchanan’s successor willbegin soon in order to have a new dean in place by Jan. 1.”Dean Buchanan has provided excellent leadership with greatsensitivity given the diversity of constituents of the college,”Mace said. “He is committed to excellence and works extremelyhard to further the missions of the college. We shall miss hisleadership.”Founded in 1859, the College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences is the second-oldest of UGA’s 14 schools and colleges.The college offers more than 20 areas of study through 11departments and has three agricultural experiment stations, fourextension educational centers and the Rural Development Center inTifton.The Cooperative Extension Service, which has agents in 157 ofGeorgia’s 159 counties and operates the 4-H program, is also partof the college.Led the college through many changesUnder Buchanan’s leadership the college created the Center forUrban Agriculture, Center for Food Safety and Center forAgriculture Business and Economic Development, the Office ofEnvironmental Sciences and the National Environmentally SoundProduction Agriculture Laboratory.Along with the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and theOffice of the Vice President for Research, the college alsoestablished the Center for Applied Genetic Technologies.Three of UGA’s 13 eminent scholars funded through the GeorgiaResearch Alliance are on the CAES faculty. Their expertiseincludes cloning and genetic engineering, embryonic stem cellresearch and energy balance regulation and growth in plants.A teaching program was started at the college’s Tifton campus.Another is slated for the Griffin campus. Buchanan helped createscience programs for high school students and teachers anddomestic and international internship programs for CAES students,including a congressional internship program that has helpedthree students get permanent jobs in congressional offices.A research farm for Vidalia onions and other vegetables wasstarted, too, as was a facility for irrigation research. Plansare under way for an animal and dairy sciences teaching facility.A modern equine exhibition and research arena was built, andseveral college facilities were expanded or renovated.Buchanan implemented a unified governance structure for thecollege, oversaw development of its first strategic plan andincreased its budget.”I’m exceedingly proud of the many accomplishments that have beenmade,” Buchanan said. “It’s been an honor to provide leadershipfor the college, even during some tough economic times. We have afaculty, staff and administration of exceptional quality in thecollege, and I’m grateful for the support I’ve received from theuniversity administration and from all the client groups weserve.”last_img read more

Vermont Public Radio wins six regional Edward R Murrow awards

first_imgVermont Public Radio has been honored with six regional Edward R. Murrow Awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association. VPR received awards for breaking news coverage, feature reporting, investigative reporting, series, sports coverage, and for the website.The winning coverage includes:Coverage of Captain Richard Phillips, who was taken captive by pirates off the Somali coast, including an interview with Phillips on Vermont Edition (Breaking News).Lynne McCrea’s continuing coverage of a homeless family in Chittenden County and their struggle to put down roots (Feature Reporting).Nina Keck’s coverage of the Vermont National Guard members who said they were denied promotions and permanent positions at the Southern State Correctional Facility in Springfield (Investigative Reporting).Comprehensive coverage of the 400th anniversary of Samuel de Champlain’s exploration of Lake Champlain, including stories from Champlain’s diary, and a live broadcast from the Burlington waterfront (Series).Steve Zind’s report on UVM’s women’s basketball and their fall to UConn in the first round of the NCAA basketball tournament (Sports).VPR.net’s news page, H1N1 flu page, States of Marriage documentary page, Hitting Home economic series page, and the Champlain 400 pages (Website).“VPR is honored to receive these awards,” said Vice President for News and Programming John Van Hoesen. “They reflect VPR’s commitment to broad and in-depth regional news coverage by our entire staff.”In all, 13 awards were made in the small market radio category for the region, which includes all of the New England states. Vermont Public Radio will be honored at a ceremony this spring.Vermont Public Radio President Robin Turnau said: “Our listeners have told us time and again that they appreciate and value VPR’s in-depth news coverage. We have our listeners and supporters to thank for allowing us to provide this service to the public.”The RTDNA has been honoring outstanding achievements in electronic journalism with the Edward R. Murrow Awards since 1971. Murrow Award recipients demonstrate the spirit of excellence that Edward R. Murrow made a standard for the broadcast news profession.Audio and text for VPR’s award-winning coverage are at VPR.net.About VPRListener-supported Vermont Public Radio has served the people of Vermont and the surrounding region since 1977. As Vermont’s only statewide public radio network, VPR is a trusted and independent source for news, music, conversation, NPR programming, and much more. The stations of VPR serve more than 170,000 listeners each week. For more information about VPR and VPR Classical, coverage maps, schedules, and streaming audio, visit www.vpr.net(link is external).Source: VPR. 4.8.2010XXXlast_img read more

The Best Summer Ever at the Springs

first_imgOther spas and healing centers are located on streets surrounding the park lending credence to claims that there are three times as many massage therapists as lawyers in town. All use the famed spring water as they offer menus of facials, massage, steams, scrubs and other bodywork treatment.   George Washington who wrote that “the waters will make a cure of me” would be amazed at what experiences are available three centuries later. For travelers in the metro area, Berkeley Springs’ proximity to the city lets families avoid air travel, and enjoy outdoor activities that allow for social distancing amid lush mountain scenery. Centuries of visitors coming to take the famed healing warm spring waters provide a well-earned aura of health and wellness; all local attractions and businesses are committed to uphold that tradition with appropriate safety precautions. Cacapon has also been ramping up its mountain biking terrain, recently becoming the first destination east of the Mississippi River to receive a Trail Accelerator grant from the International Mountain Biking Association. The park now offers about 20 miles of single-track mountain biking trails, as well as a three-mile course aimed at beginners, but with some technical features for moderate-level riders. Coolfont Resort, located about 10 minutes from Cacapon State Park, reopened in fall 2019 with renovated buildings and new amenities. New suites look out over Coolfont Lake, where Craft’s Adventures offer a slew of new water sports this summer, including kayaking, canoeing, fishing and stand-up paddleboarding. Wooded hiking trails and picnic areas create an altogether serene resort experience. This resort experience at Coolfont also includes a rustic themed restaurant overlooking the lake and a legendary bar keep. Cross the road and discover Berkeley Springs Brewery and Cold Run Valley Winery.  Discover everything you need to know at berkeleysprings.com or call 800-447-8797. Other outdoor activities at Cacapon include a sand beach lake, wobble clay shooting, horseback riding, fishing and an excellent 18-hole golf course.  Classic cabins at Cacapon State Park, newly renovated with Gat Creek furniture. Photo courtesy Travel Berkeley Springs. All of this eating, bathing and playing outside requires more than a quick drive through.  Berkeley Springs encourages visitors to stay for the night or two or longer. There are numerous cabins, cottages and fully equipped vacation homes from which to choose, many handled by Berkeley Springs Cottage Rentals. The historic Country Inn adjacent to the springs has spa and lodging packages, a chef-operated restaurant and live entertainment on weekends. Visitors to Cacapon State Park can enjoy a stay in the recently-renovated historic park cabins outfitted with local Gat Creek furniture and impressive new kitchens. By summer’s-end, Cacapon opens a new 78-room lodge with swimming pool and indoor/outdoor dining area with a fire pit. Set in the ridge and valley section of the Appalachians, Berkeley Springs offers easy access to two rivers and two state parks with ample hiking trails, peaceful lakes and historic springs. Come summer, urban families in need of some fresh air will find more activities available than ever before. Soak up the healing waters in the historic Roman Baths. Photo by Robert Peak One of the best ways to see all that the area has to offer in natural and historic wonders is to drive the 85-mile Washington Heritage Trail through the county. One of the most splendid sights along the trail is Panorama Overlook just three miles west of town. Upstairs in the Roman Bath House is the Museum of the Berkeley Springs open daily in summer and highlighting the geology and extraordinary social history generated by the springs. Local historian and Museum President, Jeanne Mozier says that “throughout its long history, Berkeley Springs has experienced periods of boom and decline. With new places opening and reopening, we’re booming and looking forward to a most memorable summer.” Panorama Overlook Along the Washington Heritage Trail. Photo by Robert Peak. Quilt Show and Sale at Ice House Art Center All Summer Long. Photo courtesy Travel Berkeley Springs Cover photo courtesy Travel Berkeley Springs Historic streets are also lined with distinctive shops and eateries for every taste from gourmet to country. Tasty shops offer everything from cheese and vintage candies to gourmet oils not to mention a dazzling array of art, antiques, a century-old hardware store and even a year ‘round Christmas boutique. This summer the Ice House Gallery is filled with the annual Quilt Show and Sale and a Yard Square Quilt display that spills out into store windows throughout the town. An auction of the yard squares will be held during Labor Day weekend. Riding mountain trails at Cacapon State Park. Photo courtesy Travel Berkeley Springs Craft’s Adventures also offers two-to-four-hour tubing trips down the nearby Cacapon and Potomac Rivers, where guests can spot deer, abundant waterfowl and the occasional shoreline bear. A different view of outdoor fun is pursued in the historic town. Berkeley Springs State Park has the largest public array of thermal spring waters in the Blue Ridge and the springpools and channel are open 24/7 for toe dabbling and child-scale paddling. There is also a more traditional public swimming pool. Most unique are the spa attractions. Tubs in the 200-year-old Roman Bath House have been newly updated to meet accessibility standards, and historically-accurate white octagonal tile has been installed. The water in all tubs is heated to between 102 and 104 degrees. It’s easy to feel the water exert its healing powers in these tubs. Cacapon State Park is a 6,000-acre haven located about 20 minutes from town, with a variety of options for outdoor adventure. Visitors can walk or hike along 23 miles of mountain trails, ranging from easygoing Piney Ridge to the more strenuous Ziler Loop. Berkeley Springs has been a choice summer destination since George Washington started visiting in the 18th century. But this summer in particular, the area is gearing up for the season with new outdoor adventures, from paddleboarding to mountain biking, as well as new lodging. Several new restaurants and a new brewery join longtime favorites.last_img read more

What is the promise of big data?

first_img 36SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jay Kassing Jay Kassing is President of MARQUIS, a Texas based provider of marketing analytics solutions including MCIF/CRM software, MCIF services, profitability, compliance, consulting and direct mail creative/fulfillment. Jay has … Web: www.gomarquis.com Details Big Data and Data Analytics promise one primary thing for Marketing and Sales: Completely Automated, Predictable, Marketing and Sales Action.Let’s not get confused. Big Data is not about a lot of different things to different people. Not in banking. Sure, many of the different groups in banking can benefit from information that is generated from Big Data and Data Analytics. In fact, being able to visualize data in simple, straightforward ways via business intelligence (BI) tools is cool and needed. But few executives at financial institutions will sustain a continued interest in seeing the same old charts and graphs, even when updated for them.The primary Benefit of Big Data and Data Analytics is realized in Marketing and Sales.Neither the sales team, nor the marketing staff, has time to collect, analyze, interpret, or determine best strategies for information derived from Big Data and Data Analytics. No time equals zero results. And, candidly, few financial institutions are fortunate enough to have a skilled analyst on the team who can find the actionable gold in all of the data, let alone one who also knows how best to act upon and harvest that gold. And all of this automation must enable your institution to reach an audience of one. Yes, just one.The best way to imagine this benefit is to think of Amazon. If you’ve ever searched for something, anything on Amazon, you cannot help but notice that they will recommend something else to you, based on your predictable behavior.What if this same process was automated for your marketing and sales efforts, with and for your clients? What if the data collection was done for you, every day, automatically? What if the analysis was also done for you so that predictable opportunities for loan and deposit growth, retention, cross-sales, onboarding, etc., were all automatically tabulated and scored? Then, what if each essential and predictable sales and marketing opportunity was acted upon automatically, every day, for you? Big Data and Data Analytics should deliver on this primary benefit for you seamlessly, from data collection through direct mail/email fulfillment. Automatically. Every Day.“Completely Automated, Predictable, Marketing and Sales Action” is the primary benefit of Big Data and Data Analytics. This unique ability is how your financial institution will monetize the investment for Big Data and Data Analytics. This is where the results will be both obvious and provable. Automated, predictable marketing action turns into clearly identifiable revenue and profit – and better client engagement.In a world where more is expected of everyone in sales and marketing, the prize in Big Data is the power of automation and the power to leverage data and predictable behavior. Shouldn’t your sales and marketing departments be doing this too?We can all agree that the information derived from Big Data and Data Analytics is really cool. That said, Marketing and Sales are the clear beneficiaries, especially when they enjoy the primary benefit of Completely Automated, Predictable, Marketing and Sales Action.This is the promise of Big Data and Data Analytics.last_img read more

PLSA delivers guide to ‘new discipline’ of implementation disclosures

first_imgThe Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association (PLSA) has produced a guide to new investment disclosure duties for UK pension schemes, encouraging them to produce meaningful disclosures rather than just focussing on compliance.Under new rules coming into force in October, defined benefit (DB) and defined contribution (DC) schemes face new requirements to publicly disclose, in an “implementation statement”, their investment and responsible investment activity over the previous year.The requirement is for these statements to set out how and to what extent their activity followed the intent captured in the scheme’s statement of investment principles (SIP), which since a year ago must address trustees’ policies on financially material environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors.Caroline Escott, outgoing senior policy lead on investment and stewardship at the PLSA, said the implementation statements were “a very new discipline for trustees”, and “will require them to carefully consider which investment decisions and activities have or will have the greatest impact on their investment objectives”. The requirements differ for DC/hybrid and DB-only schemes, although common to both is a requirement to disclose their voting and engagement behaviour. Sarah Wilson, founder and CEO of proxy voting agency Minerva, said this was “a once in a generation shift in legal responsibilities” for trustees.The PLSA’s guide sets out general principles as well as more detailed considerations for trustees to produce “relevant, succinct and meaningful statements”, with the association noting that “policymakers, the public and scheme members will be paying close attention” to the content of the implementation statements.Be clear on vote ‘ownership’On voting disclosures, the PLSA advises trustees to be clear about who “owns” the vote in their particular investment arrangements and along their voting chain.It said it recognised that schemes with investments in pooled funds would have a different scope for influence compared with those with segregated mandates, but that it believed the former could still “exert their influence and seek to challenge their managers on their (engagement) and voting activity”.The PLSA also said the avenues pension plans had for influencing investment, and particularly voting, decisions undertaken on their behalf would continue to change.Trustees should keep an eye out on developments in the Law Commission’s work on intermediated securities, the HM Treasury’s asset management taskforce work on stewardship, and the EU sustainable finance initiative, among other areas, the association said.“This guide aims to cut through some of the confusion around implementation statements”Laura Myers, chair of the voting and implementation statement working groupThe PSLA’s guide is the product of a new cross-industry working group and a stakeholder group comprised of representatives from government, regulators and industry organisations.“This guide aims to cut through some of the confusion around implementation statements and give practical steps on how to collate this information and communicate it to stakeholders,” wrote Laura Myers, chair of the working group and a member of the PLSA policy board, in the introduction to the guide.“We believe that the principles underpinning the implementation statements will help focus schemes on their long-term investment goals. Getting these disclosures right will help schemes become more sustainable, improve stakeholder relations and ultimately make better investment decisions that have the interests of members and savers at their heart.”The cross-industry group is also working on a voting template for asset managers to fill in, and the PLSA is encouraging trustees to use this. IPE understands the template and guidance are being finalised and will be launched within the next few weeks.The PLSA’s guide to the implementation statements can be found here.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here.last_img read more

Chess Olympiad gold may make govt look at players positively: V. Anand

first_imgCHENNAI: Former world chess champion V. Anand on Monday said India winning the gold in the FIDE Online Olympiad will have a positive impact on the way the central government looks at the game and the players.He also categorically said the Indian team was ready even for a replay of the second match against Russia in the FIDE Online Olympiad. The Indian team had an interaction with the media online. Speaking to reporters, Anand said the last few years saw a change in the attitude of Ministry of Sports towards the chess players as they didn’t get any awards (Arjuna or Dronacharya) for doing well in international competitions. He said absence of awards may be due to various issues and also the All India Chess Federation (AICF) had some difficulties. Anand said the situation could be changed or reset not by writing long letters to the editor but by having good results like this – winning the Online Olympiad medal. Referring to the Olympiad gold medal win Anand said this may have a positive impact and the government will look at chess positively. On Sunday, the Indian team was congratulated by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Sports Minister Kiren Rijiju, Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, Congress leader Rahul Gandhi and others. According to K. Humpy, the Olympiad victory will prompt may youngsters to take to chess. India and Russia were declared as joint Olympiad gold winners on Sunday by FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich after two Indians – Nihal Sarin and Divya Deshmukh – were disconnected from the www.chess.com server due to internet outage. “We did nothing wrong. We were ready for anything. We were ready to play two games or even six games. FIDE looked at the big picture,” Anand said. According to FIDE the match would have gone for tie-break based on the board positions of Nihal versus Andrey Esipenko and Deshmukh versus Polina Shuvalovaat the time of internet outage, but that did not happen due to internet disconnection. As for the mixed team format – two men and women players, one junior girl and boy – Anand said he was happy with it so that India can show its strength. He said the whole team chipped in for the victory. The crucial match was against China and the tie-break game against Poland. Anand said the Olympiad gold will be a special gold in his cabinet. IANSAlso Watch: Power Lines or Death Traps?last_img read more

Hiring freeze finally comes to an end

first_imgUSC’s university-wide hiring freeze finally came to a conclusion on July 1, but officials say that departments will still be carefully evaluating the need to create new positions from here on out.The university initiated the freeze in 2008 as a financial buffer in the slowing economy. The freeze was originally scheduled to end in June  2009, but university officials announced an extension of the freeze last year.“The hiring freeze was a pre-emptive move to make sure we wouldn’t be in a position where we would have to cut out any of our programs,” said Robert Cooper, vice provost for planning and budget.Before the freeze, departments could create new staff and faculty positions at their own discretion, as long as they had the funds to do so.Anticipating that families of university employees could be impacted by the economy, USC initiated the freeze as a precaution to prevent any dramatic layoffs or other cutbacks during the economic recession.“The financial issue for USC was minimal,” Cooper said. “We did not see a reduction in the number of students, so in terms of tuition revenue, we weathered the storm.”The university implemented a new hiring process that asked each department to closely analyze new positions and streamline any administrative work during the freeze. Hiring requests were handled on a case-by-case basis within each department, before being sent to the university and then to the provost’s office for a final decision.“Deans were to look at the positions and they were asked to only post the critical positions,” Cooper said.Though the freeze is now over, the university will continue to follow the hiring procedures enacted for the last two years. The process requires analysis of each new position and top approval for those positions, Cooper said.According to Cooper, the administration wanted to ensure that the student experience at USC would not change if the university experienced any sort of financial difficulty.“It was not an across the board, ‘no exceptions made’ type of freeze,” Cooper said. “We wanted to make sure what we did didn’t impact the students.”Geneva Overholser, director of Annenberg’s School of Journalism, said her department was able to make hires during the freeze when it was necessary.“We are lucky since many of our fellow journalism schools, especially state schools, were not able to hire faculty,” Overholser said. “We have been very blessed with wonderful faculty hires we made during the freeze and I am grateful to the university for keeping the faculty lines open to hiring.”Samantha Klein, a senior majoring in fine arts, said she did not notice any changes because of the hiring freeze.“As a student, the only reason I knew there was a hiring freeze was because I heard people where I work in [Information Technology Programs] talking about it,” Klein said. “Other than that I didn’t notice anything, especially since the school stepped up the off-campus security with all the new guards.”USC is currently looking to create 550 new positions.last_img read more

Quarterback battle heats up as spring practice ends

first_imgIn a spring fraught with injuries and difficulty, the USC football team held its final spring practice before its annual spring scrimmage at the Coliseum on Saturday.Putting in work · Sophomore quarterback Cody Kessler (above) stayed after practice at Howard Jones Field on Thursday to get some more throws in before Saturday’s scrimmage at the Coliseum. – Joseph Chen | Daily Trojan The Trojans practiced without kneepads for the second consecutive practice, but the diminished physicality didn’t detract from the intensity and speed of the drills.Junior wide receiver Marqise Lee again had a field day working out against the young Trojan secondary, making his presence known through a variety of dazzling catches including a leaping two-handed grab amid a shroud of defenders in the end zone during situational drills.The battle at quarterback heated up as redshirt sophomore quarterbacks Max Wittek and Cody Kessler looked neck and neck during passing drills. The two quarterbacks had somewhat differing approaches to Saturday’s exhibition matchup; predictably, incumbent starter Wittek appeared nonplussed and determined about his performance.“Obviously it’s a shorter scrimmage, but [I’ll try to] make the plays that are there, make the open throws and don’t try to force anything,” Wittek said. “I don’t have to go out on the last day [of spring practice] and make a crazy splash in the competition or anything. I think the real body of work is the resume that I’ve put on film over the past 14 practices.”Though Wittek’s throwing mechanics and ball velocity remain impressive, the redshirt sophomore has taken to improving other areas of his play this spring.“Decision-making and timing, making those decisions in a quick manner,” Wittek said. “Not to throw it every play — the big play’s not going to be made on every down. To take off and run and check it down if I need to.”Conversely, Kessler stuck around following practice and got in some practice snaps and extra throws on a practically deserted Howard Jones Field. Theoretically speaking, it is Kessler who has the most to gain from a strong showing Saturday. Though Wittek has made an impression in starts against Notre Dame and Georgia Tech last season, Kessler and his play have remained largely out of the auspices of the general public. Saturday will be his first chance to show the public at least a glimpse of his capabilities.“You come in ready to compete,” Kessler said. “Even though it is intersquad, you approach it like it’s game day. It’s Saturday, it’s in the Coliseum; we’re going to have fans there; it’s going to be nice to play in front of them.”Head coach Lane Kiffin was pleased, in particular, with his quarterbacks’ ability to take care of the ball — a positive sign after the Trojan quarterbacks combined for 20 interceptions last season.“[The quarterbacks] have really limited turnovers in the Coliseum this spring, which is very different than last spring … [considering] how much we were turning the ball over especially at quarterback, so it’s been really good,” Kiffin said.Saturday’s exhibition at the Coliseum, which begins at 1 p.m., probably won’t offer too many definitive answers regarding the depth chart — Kiffin’s post-spring depth chart will be released April 15 — but it will at least give the Trojan faithful and the public at large a clearer picture of the quarterback race.last_img read more

Syracuse basketball opponent preview: What to know about No. 7 seed Dayton

first_imgThe Dayton Report: There are many of the same players that Dayton had on that 2014 team still on the roster — including four of its top five current scorers. The Flyers dominated the A-10 for most of the season but has lost four of its past eight games, including a three-point loss to St. Joseph’s in the conference tournament semifinals.Dayton has posted wins this season over Monmouth, Iowa, Vanderbilt and St. Bonaventure. Its worst losses this season were on the road at La Salle and at home against Rhode Island. It has the 13th most efficient defense in the nation, per Kenpom.com and is one of the best defensive rebounding teams, a strength that has hurt Syracuse in recent games against Pittsburgh and North Carolina. The Flyers do turn the ball over on nearly 19 percent of their possessions, which is above the Division I average, and don’t get a ton of offensive rebounds.MORE COVERAGE:Breaking down the Syracuse-Dayton matchupDougherty: One of Syracuse’s defining characteristics will no longer be enoughSyracuse basketball roundtable: SU-Dayton and Trevor Cooney’s legacy How Syracuse beats Dayton: Syracuse has to be able to crash both the defensive glass, and the offensive glass against Dayton. If it can keep the rebounding battle even and make some of its 3-pointers, it will be in pretty good shape. The last time the two teams met, Syracuse was empty from behind the arc and that cannot happen again. Trevor Cooney needs to awake from his stupor and so does Tyler Roberson. The Flyers might be struggling just like the Orange, but they’ve won games this year on the defensive end and on the glass, and Syracuse can’t play the slow type of game that Dayton has forced its opponents to play all season. Published on March 16, 2016 at 12:51 am Daily Orange File Photo Facebook Twitter Google+ Stats to know 8 — times this season that Dayton has won a game while holding opponents to under 60 points.10.8 — percent of 2-point shots that Steve McElvene blocks when he’s in the game, good for 14th in Division I, per Kenpom.4 — Four of Dayton’s top five scorers were a part of the 2013-14 team that beat Syracuse in the NCAA Tournament.Player to watch: Dyshawn Pierre is one of Dayton’s most high-volume scorers and also was its leading scorer against Syracuse in 2014. He posted 22 points in Dayton’s last game against St. Joseph’s. He may also be the guy with the ball in his hands late in this game if it’s close, since he’s a near-85 percent free-throw shooter, which is definitely rare for his big-man stature. Comments Daily Orange File Photo Syracuse (19-13, 9-9 Atlantic Coast) opens up its NCAA Tournament run with Dayton (25-7, 14-4 Atlantic 10) on Friday in St. Louis. The Orange got into the Tournament as a No. 10 seed, overachieving on the projections that had it as either one of the last four teams in or completely out.After missing out on the NCAA Tournament last season, Syracuse is back. And here is everything you need to know about the No. 7 seed Flyers.All-time Series: Friday will mark the fourth time that the Flyers and Orange have met. Syracuse is 1-2 and hasn’t won since the inaugural meeting in 1975.Last time they played: The two teams haven’t met since March 22, 2014. That also happened to be in the Round of 32 in the NCAA Tournament, when the No. 3-seeded Orange lost a 55-53 decision to No. 11-seed Dayton. Dyshawn Pierre and Jordan Sibert were the only players in double figures for the Flyers. And while Tyler Ennis led all scorers with 19 points, his buzzer-beating game-winning shot was off the mark and it ended an SU season that started out 25-0.“When it left my hands it looked good,” Ennis said after the game. “Up until I saw it bounce out, I thought it was going to bounce back in.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse shot 0-of-10 from 3 in that game and was outrebounded. The Flyers shot better, but still the Orange had a last-minute chance to avoid the upset. Many players were in the locker room crying after the loss. Related Stories Rapid thoughts on Syracuse-Dayton NCAA Tournament matchupDougherty: 1 of Syracuse’s defining characteristics will no longer be enoughBOUNCED OUT: Dayton upsets Syracuse 55-53 in Round of 32 as Ennis’ game-winning attempt rims outSyracuse basketball roundtable: Dayton rematch, what SU needs to do to win and Trevor Cooney’s legacyFormer SU Provost Eric Spina: ‘I have a new love and that’s Dayton’last_img read more

Women’s soccer: Wisconsin returns home to host Purdue

first_imgThe University of Wisconsin women’s soccer team is coming off Sunday’s disappointing 1-0 loss against the Scarlet Knights. This was their second game this season without putting the ball in the net.The team is now in the midst of a 0-2-1 three-game stretch against Michigan, Maryland and Rutgers after having won the previous seven games, including two Big Ten matchups. The Badgers now sit at 8-3-1 overall and have now dropped to No. 26 in the NCAA rankings after having spent much of the first part of the season ranked in the top 25. They look to recover from their broken winning streak and get their season back on track Friday night against the Purdue Boilermakers in Madison. This is a much needed return to campus after being unable to win their previous two games on the road. The Purdue Boilermakers womens team is currently an impressive 9-2-1 including 4-0-1 in the Big Ten with wins over Michigan, Michigan State, Northwestern, and Illinois. The NCAA has them ranked at 28, just two spots behind the Badgers. They are led in goals by Maddy Williams, who leads the Big Ten currently with nine goals as well to go along with an impressive eight assists. Their second top offensive player so far has been Andrea Petrina who has contributed heavily to the Boilermakers offense with five goals and four assists thus far. This offense should prove to be a challenge for the Badgers defense, who have performed well this season. The Badgers have shut out six teams in their 12 games played, which is a testament to how well Caitlyn Clem and the defense have been playing. The Badgers are led in scoring by sophomore Dani Rhodes with eight goals and Lauren Rice with three goals.The game will be played at 7 p.m. on Friday evening at McClimon Soccer Complex and will be available to watch on Big Ten Network Plus. Tune in to watch the Badgers attempt to get their season back on track in the second half of the season.last_img read more