Guided-Missile Cruiser Transits Strait of Gibraltar

first_img View post tag: Transits View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy View post tag: Cruiser The guided-missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG 68) safely transited through the Strait of Gibraltar to enter into the 6th Fleet area of responsibility, May 21.The Strait of Gibraltar is a narrow transit which separates Europe and Africa by only seven miles at its most narrow point, connecting the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea. It is also a very busy route with a significant amount of commercial traffic.“The hardest part about the transit for this ship is the traffic,” Quartermaster 1st Class (SW) Jussusam Cardoso, the ship’s assistant navigator, said. “The navigation team assists in tracking the other vessels and will make recommendations to the conning officer and officer of the deck for a course change.”The transit takes a significant amount of support from the bridge team, security forces, helmsman, and to the Sailors that monitor radio and satellite activity and down in the engineering plants.“The Anzio team executed the transit well,” Capt. John M. Dorey, Anzio’s commanding officer, said. “Every member from the bridge team, lookouts, the combat information center team and weapons crew knew what we had to get done and were on top of their game.”Anzio is underway as part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group. The Strike Group is made up of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2, USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 staff, guided-missile cruisers USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and USS Anzio (CG 68), and guided-missile destroyers USS Truxtun (DDG 103) and USS Mitscher (DDG 57).Brian M. Brooks (navy)[mappress]Source: navy, May 24, 2011; View post tag: Guided-missile May 24, 2011 View post tag: Gibraltar Guided-Missile Cruiser Transits Strait of Gibraltar View post tag: Strait Back to overview,Home naval-today Guided-Missile Cruiser Transits Strait of Gibraltar Share this articlelast_img read more

Coast Guard, USS Whidbey Island Team Up To Fight Piracy

first_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Island View post tag: Whidbey View post tag: to View post tag: Naval Back to overview,Home naval-today Coast Guard, USS Whidbey Island Team Up To Fight Piracy View post tag: Navy An elite U.S. Coast Guard unit joined the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team on amphibious dock landing ship USS Whidbey Island (LSD 41) to conduct counter-piracy and maritime security operations in the Gulf of Aden.Members of a maritime safety and security team, based out of Seattle, Wash., and an advanced interdiction team from San Diego, Calif., came together in February, forming the eight-man team.“Our team specializes in boardings,” said Lt. j.g. Michael Holt, officer in charge of the Coast Guard team. “Back home, our focus is mainly on counter-drug operations, but it’s fairly easy for us to put our training to use for counter-piracy missions.”Prior to joining Whidbey Island, Holt’s team attended three weeks of additional training to prepare them for the unique overseas environment.“It’s a very similar mission, but out here we’re not just enforcing U.S. laws, and of course the threat level is inherently higher,” said Holt.The Coast Guard team provides training, experience, and the perspective of full-time boarding team experts.“For our team, VBSS is a collateral duty that’s incorporated when our schedule permits,” said Chief Master-at-Arms Gil Hurtado, Whidbey Island assistant boarding team officer. “The Coast Guard team is rated and billeted for this mission, making them a more fluid unit. Combining the two forces will sharpen our team’s movements and enhance their tactics.”The Coast Guard unit trains with the ship’s VBSS team twice a week. They cover topics such as mission planning, team integration, boarding fundamentals and detainee processing.“The teams work well together, and we definitely benefit from the merger,” said Hurtado.“This is a unique opportunity, and one of the best Navy ships I’ve been on,” said Holt. “Everyone has been very welcoming, hospitable, and gone out of their way to help us out any time we’ve needed anything.”Whidbey Island is deployed as part of the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group (BATARG), supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.[mappress]Source: navy, September 13, 2011; View post tag: fight View post tag: Guardcenter_img View post tag: coast View post tag: piracy Share this article View post tag: USS View post tag: up View post tag: team September 13, 2011 Coast Guard, USS Whidbey Island Team Up To Fight Piracylast_img read more

Yantar Shipyard to Deliver First of Three Frigates to Indian Navy in April 2012

first_img View post tag: Frigates View post tag: Indian View post tag: April View post tag: 2012 View post tag: Yantar Back to overview,Home naval-today Yantar Shipyard to Deliver First of Three Frigates to Indian Navy in April 2012 March 2, 2012 View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Naval Industry newscenter_img View post tag: shipyard View post tag: deliver View post tag: Navy First out of three frigates built by Yantar Shipyard (Kaliningrad, Russia) will be delivered to Indian Navy in Apr 2012, reports RIA Novosti.Frigate INS Teg has already passed state trials. Second frigate for Indian Navy – INS Tarkash – is under mooring trials, the third ship – INS Trikand – is being completed at the yard. Each ship will be handed over to the customer with a half-year interval.Yantar has been building frigates (on Russian classification – escort ships) for Indian Navy since 2006. In total, the shipyard builds three frigates – INS Teg (“Saber”), INS Tarkash (“Quiver”), and INS Trikand (“Bow”). Project 11356 was developed by Severnoye Design Bureau subordinate to United Shipbuilding Corporation.The frigates are armed with BrahMos missile system having high accuracy and capable to hit targets at 290 km.Project 11356 frigates are used for searching and destruction of submarines, antiship/ASW/antiaircraft defense. The ships’ length is 125 meters, beam is 15 meters, displacement is 4,000 tons, endurance is 5,000 nautical miles, crew is 220 men.Yantar shipyard was registered as a joint stock company in 1996. It is specialized in construction of small- and mid-size warships and civil vessels, ship-repair works, production of maritime and commercial structures.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , March 02, 2012; Image: shipyard-yantar View post tag: first View post tag: three Yantar Shipyard to Deliver First of Three Frigates to Indian Navy in April 2012 Share this articlelast_img read more

US Aircraft Carrier Hosts Pre-Deployment Fair

first_img April 6, 2012 View post tag: Navy Training & Education View post tag: George More than 3,000 Sailors from the Nimitz class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) and their families took part in a command-sponsored pre-deployment fair April 2.The goal of the fair is to ensure the crew and their families are deployment ready.Sailors had the opportunity to visit more than 20 booths featuring legal, financial, medical, religious and even Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR)information and advice in order to create a more stable foundation for themselves and their dependents when the ship pulls out on its next patrol.“This is something we do every year and it’s first and foremost for the Sailors… especially for the single Sailors that are deploying for the first time,” said Lt. Benjamin Howard, a command chaplain stationed aboard George Washington. “Right at their fingertips, this give them the information that they will need while on deployment.”“I think the ombudsman is one of the best booths offered,” said Religious Programs Specialist 3rd Class Micchicco Hunter, one of more than 3,000 Sailors who attended. “Ombudsman acts as the link between the Sailors and their families. We have a lot of people coming to the chapel who miss their families while deployed and ombudsman really help keep that connection open.”Ombudsman are representative of the commanding officer, responsible for establishing and maintaining current and accurate communication between the command and its family members. “I liked the Family Readiness Group (FRG) and MWR booths,” said Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Recruit Jessica Keener-Dragoo, a newly arriving Sailor to the George Washington. “They gave us a lot of information, a lot of things to do and everyone was very friendly and nice. I didn’t know anything when I got here, but I feel I learned a lot and feel that my family will be taken care of.”The FRG is an integral part of a support service network that bundles key support services such as Ombudsmen, Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSCs), chaplains, school liaison officers and child development centers at the command level. “It may seem tedious at first glance, but if Sailors take advantage of the information that is given here, it will benefit them in the long run,” said Howard.This year marks George Washington’s fourth pre-deployment fair at Fleet Activities Yokosuka (CFAY) and officials hope the event continues to get better each year.George Washington is currently pier side in Yokosuka, Japan and making preparations to return to sea.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , April 06, 2012; US Aircraft Carrier Hosts Pre-Deployment Fair View post tag: USS View post tag: American View post tag: Aircraft Share this article View post tag: 73 View post tag: hosts Back to overview,Home naval-today US Aircraft Carrier Hosts Pre-Deployment Fair View post tag: Japan View post tag: Naval View post tag: Pre-Deployment View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Fair View post tag: Washington View post tag: Yokosuka View post tag: US View post tag: CVN View post tag: Carrierlast_img read more

Chief Selectees Begin Path on USS Dwight D. Eisenhower

first_img Share this article View post tag: Navy View post tag: D. View post tag: begin Fifty-eight 1st class petty officers aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), Carrier Air Wing Seven and the staff of Carrier Strike Group Eight were selected for advancement to chief petty officer, July 31.While operating in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, the selectees were announced by Capt. Marcus A. Hitchcock, IKE’s commanding officer and Capt. Samuel Paparo, commander Carrier Air Wing Seven, during a ship-wide announcement. “When I first found out I made Chief, there were a lot of emotions,” said Chief (Sel.) Machinist’s Mate (SW/AW) Chris Navitskis of reactor propulsion division. “To be selected to become part of that group is a pretty surreal feeling. I knew my time would come, I just wasn’t expecting it so quickly.”Selectees aboard IKE will wear a “Chief Selectee” badge and will soon change their title to “Chief,” forever changing their naval careers.“It really is an honor to be selected for chief,” said Chief (Sel.) Aviation Structural Mechanic (AW/SW) Francis Furstman, from the Jolly Rogers of VFA-103. “It’s been a career long goal of mine. I’m looking forward to taking more of a role as a mentor and leader.”The CPO selectees welcome the new challenge of taking charge of the deckplates and leading junior Sailors.“For the past few years, I have been trying to step up and be a leader for the younger guys,” said Navitskis. “Now, I’ll be able to have a stronger and deeper impact on junior Sailors. Everybody always looks up to the Chief, and to become a part of that tradition is humbling.”Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Gregg Snaza explained that prior to putting the gold anchors of a chief petty officer on their uniforms, selectees must go through an induction process.During the induction process, selectees receive physical training, mentoring, and training in the various new responsibilities they will take on with the gold anchors. IKE’s induction ends on Sept. 14, with a pinning ceremony.“The next six weeks will be challenging as they dive into the roles and responsibilities of a chief petty officer,” said Snaza. “IKE has more than 300 chiefs aboard and I think I speak for all of them when I say we’re looking forward to this year’s induction.”Snaza said another goal is to revitalize the chief’s mess by reinforcing the traditions and meaning behind the chief petty officers.“Our goal is to illuminate the challenges that chiefs face every day and to impart upon our new selectees that leadership and integrity are key,” said Snaza. “I look forward to induction every year. It recharges my batteries and brings back to the forefront all the great things chiefs stand for.”For those Sailors selected, being advanced is the result of years of hard work, dedication, and help from those before them.“Making chief has always been a goal of mine,” said Navitskis. “I wouldn’t be here without other chiefs who helped me along the way.”Eisenhower is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operation conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, August 3, 2012 View post tag: Eisenhower View post tag: Selectees View post tag: Dwight View post tag: chief View post tag: USScenter_img View post tag: Naval Chief Selectees Begin Path on USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Back to overview,Home naval-today Chief Selectees Begin Path on USS Dwight D. Eisenhower August 3, 2012 View post tag: ON View post tag: path Authorities View post tag: News by topiclast_img read more

HMS Trenchant Clocks Up Nine Months on Patrol in Indian Ocean

first_imgThe crew of hunter-killer submarine HMS Trenchant have passed the nine-month barrier on their marathon tour of duty in the Indian Ocean. The Plymouth-based boat has clocked up 277 days on patrol since leaving Devon last year, continually maintaining the UK’s submarine presence east of Suez.She sailed on June 22 – a month before the London Olympics and nearly six months before the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge announced they were expecting their first child.Since then she’s carried out operational patrols and international training exercises have been entwined with port visits to Fujairah in the UAE, Christmas and New Year in Bahrain and a quick trip around the Indian Ocean, including a visit to the remote UK territory of Diego Garcia.Trenchant has worked with six Royal Navy warships – frigates Westminster, Sutherland, Northumberland and Monmouth, new destroyer HMS Diamond and minehunter Quorn – as well as various American units (including one submarine, USS Providence) and one French submarine (FS Casablanca).The T-boat has also received plenty of high-profile visitors, hosting everyone from admirals and various defence attachés to the crew’s family members and military personnel from the US and Australia.Due to the length of Trenchant’s tour of duty, most of her crew have been rotated – but ten submariners have done the full 277 days so far.Specialist sonar rider Lt Cdr Graham ‘Yorkie’ Thorley has passed another milestone: a grand total of 5,000 sea days in his career – that’s more than 13½ years at sea.He joined up aged 16 and has worked his way up through the ranks through multiple submarines – and multiple classes of submarine – to serve as the specialist sonar rider on Trenchant. Although he claims “It’s just my job”, he should be justifiably proud of his achievement.Sonar controller PO Ignatius Oberholzer, who’s been aboard for the duration of the deployment, has notched up one million metres – that’s 1,000km, 621 miles or roughly the distance from Plymouth to Hamburg – on one of Trenchant’s rowing machines; he also plans to row the length of the Suez Canal when the boat goes through later in the year on her way home to Devonport.Twenty-nine members of the crew have earned the coveted Dolphins – the badge of honour, irrespective of rank, which signifies that they are fully-qualified submariners ­ while deployed.A few received their ‘badges’ when Britain’s most senior sailor – and former submarine commander – First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Mark Stanhope visited the boat.Over £750 has been raised, through a variety of means, for the boat’s chosen charity – the Derriford Neo-Natal unit in Plymouth.Lt Cdr Stuart Barrie, the weapon engineer officer and another crew member of the ‘Black Watch’, who’s been onboard since June 22 said:“It’s been an enjoyable deployment so far with lots of varied tasking and experiences.“However, it’s always tough being separated from family, especially during the periods when we are without communications with home – which can be as long as seven weeks. I’ve been fortunate that my wife and children have visited twice, including Christmas in Bahrain.”“The lads deserve a huge amount of credit for all that we have achieved, and everyone onboard is looking forward to getting back home later in the year, following the successful completion of our future tasking.”At nine months and four days away, Trenchant’s deployment is far from over. With further training exercises, including taking the latest class of trainee submarine watch-leaders to sea, port visits and wider regional engagement still to complete, the boat remains poised and ready for action.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, March 26, 2013; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: Patrol View post tag: ocean Training & Education View post tag: Trenchant Share this article View post tag: Naval View post tag: Indian View post tag: month View post tag: upcenter_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: Clocks View post tag: NINE View post tag: News by topic HMS Trenchant Clocks Up Nine Months on Patrol in Indian Ocean View post tag: HMS March 26, 2013 Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Trenchant Clocks Up Nine Months on Patrol in Indian Ocean last_img read more

UK: HMS Lancaster Deploys

first_img View post tag: Defence UK: HMS Lancaster Deploys View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy May 28, 2013 Share this article View post tag: Defense View post tag: Lancastercenter_img View post tag: HMS View post tag: Deploys Back to overview,Home naval-today UK: HMS Lancaster Deploys Portsmouth-based Type 23 frigate HMS Lancaster left Portsmouth today (Tuesday 28 May) for a six month deployment to the North Atlantic and Caribbean.The Atlantic Patrol will provide a challenging deployment for the ship, where she is scheduled to undertake a range of tasks across the region in support of British interests. Her tasking will focus on the reassurance and security of the British Overseas territories, the provision of humanitarian aid and disaster relief during the core hurricane season and counter narcotic operations with partner nations.During the six-month deployment Lancaster, affectionately nicknamed the Queen’s Frigate after her sponsor Her Majesty the Queen, will visit all six of the British Overseas Territories in the region as well as numerous Commonwealth and Caribbean countries in order to conduct regional defence engagement. These visits will provide the opportunity to train with other navies as well as demonstrate the Royal Navy’s continued commitment to the region.In between visits, Lancaster will be conducting counter narcotics patrols in conjunction with the US Coast Guard but will remain at high readiness throughout the deployment to provide support and life-saving assistance in the wake of a hurricane or other natural disaster.HMS Lancaster’s Commanding Officer, Commander Steve Moorhouse, said:“I am extremely proud of my ship’s company who have worked tirelessly over the last 18 months regenerating Lancaster from refit and preparing her for this demanding deployment. After months of rigorous training, Lancaster is ready to take her place on the front line of naval operations. Although working primarily in the Caribbean region with a wide range of island partners and South and Central American nations, we will, in the best traditions of the Royal Navy, be ready to respond to whatever challenges may arise over the next six months.”Able Seaman Henry Bowyer said: “I am looking forward to deployment, particularly because this is my first taste of overseas operations and a chance to do my job to its full potential. In addition I am looking forward to exploring new places and experiencing new cultures especially the ones in the sunshine!”The deployment is Lancaster’s first since an extensive refit in 2011/12. Upgrades included the latest version of the Seawolf missile defence system as well as a new flight deck. Following this the ship undertook an extensive build-up to deployment, where she was thoroughly trained and assessed for every eventuality by the world’s premier naval training organisation, Flag Officer Sea Training.[mappress]Press Release, May 28, 2013; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: News by topic Training & Educationlast_img read more

Image of the Day: Rainbow Forms over USS John C. Stennis

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Image of the Day: Rainbow Forms over USS John C. Stennis View post tag: Rainbow February 5, 2015 View post tag: USS John C. Stennis Image of the Day: Rainbow Forms over USS John C. Stennis View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Pacific Ocean While sailing in the Pacific Ocean, the US Navy’s aircraft carrier experienced something amazing.The Sailors of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) were able to witness a rainbow that formed over the bow of the vessel.John C. Stennis is undergoing an operational training period in preparation for future deployments.It is the seventh Nimitz-class nuclear-powered supercarrier in the United States Navy, named for Senator John C. Stennis of Mississippi. She was commissioned on 9 December 1995. Her home port is Bremerton, Washington.Image: US Navy View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy Authorities Share this article View post tag: Image of the Day View post tag: Forms View post tag: americaslast_img read more

USS Blue Ridge Trains for Upcoming Deployment

first_img February 27, 2015 USS Blue Ridge Trains for Upcoming Deployment Authorities View post tag: News by topic Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Blue Ridge Trains for Upcoming Deployment View post tag: USS Blue Ridge Share this article View post tag: upcomingcenter_img View post tag: americas View post tag: Trains Sailors aboard U.S 7th Fleet Flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19) conducted a simulated underway known as a “fast cruise” Feb. 27, to prepare for their upcoming sea trials.The fast cruise is a series of seamanship and damage control training evolutions designed to reacclimatize Sailors into an underway mindset and gauge overall operational readiness after a lengthy period pier side.After a 6-month inactive period, the ship’s Flying Squad, first responders to any shipboard casualties, jumped back into training by running several damage control drills.The fast cruise concluded with Sailors manning their general quarters’ stations and eventually conducting an abandon ship scenario.Blue Ridge has been forward deployed to Yokosuka, Japan for 35 years. As the flagship for Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet, Vice Adm. Robert L. Thomas, Blue Ridge is vital in maintaining partnerships in the 7th Fleet area of operations.[mappress mapid=”15261″]Image: US Navy View post tag: Navy View post tag: Deployment View post tag: Navallast_img read more

USS George Washington starting four-year overhaul

first_img August 4, 2017 USS George Washington starting four-year overhaul Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today USS George Washington starting four-year overhaul The U.S. Navy’s sixth aircraft carrier, USS George Washington, is set to arrive at Newport News Shipbuilding on Friday to begin its four-year mid-life refit after 25 years of service.This was announced by Newport News Shipbuilding president Jennifer Boykin who said the company had been working under a planning contract for almost three years and recently signed an agreement to begin execution work.During the refit, also known as refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH), and the follow-on outfitting period, nearly all combat systems equipment on the carrier will be refurbished, upgraded or replaced with newer technology.The ship will receive upgraded weapons systems; to include Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM), Evolved NATO Sea Sparrow Missile System, Close-In Weapons System (CIWS), Mk-38 25mm automatic gun systems, and anti-torpedo defense systems.Consolidated afloat networks and enterprise services (CANES) will become the new ship-wide network, which will include a new video distribution and surveillance systems, and the mast and the SPN-49 radar tower will be cut off and replaced with a modern design.Announcing the arrival of CVN 73, Boykin added that major upgrades will be also performed on the aircraft launch and recovery systems.USS George Washington follows in the footsteps of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) which was redelivered to the navy in May this year, after spending four years in the same shipyard undergoing RCOH. View post tag: RCOHcenter_img View post tag: US Navy View post tag: USS George Washington View post tag: Newport News Shipbuilding Share this articlelast_img read more