Guided-Missile Cruiser Transits Strait of Gibraltar

first_img View post tag: Transits View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy View post tag: Cruiser The guided-missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG 68) safely transited through the Strait of Gibraltar to enter into the 6th Fleet area of responsibility, May 21.The Strait of Gibraltar is a narrow transit which separates Europe and Africa by only seven miles at its most narrow point, connecting the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea. It is also a very busy route with a significant amount of commercial traffic.“The hardest part about the transit for this ship is the traffic,” Quartermaster 1st Class (SW) Jussusam Cardoso, the ship’s assistant navigator, said. “The navigation team assists in tracking the other vessels and will make recommendations to the conning officer and officer of the deck for a course change.”The transit takes a significant amount of support from the bridge team, security forces, helmsman, and to the Sailors that monitor radio and satellite activity and down in the engineering plants.“The Anzio team executed the transit well,” Capt. John M. Dorey, Anzio’s commanding officer, said. “Every member from the bridge team, lookouts, the combat information center team and weapons crew knew what we had to get done and were on top of their game.”Anzio is underway as part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group. The Strike Group is made up of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2, USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 staff, guided-missile cruisers USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and USS Anzio (CG 68), and guided-missile destroyers USS Truxtun (DDG 103) and USS Mitscher (DDG 57).Brian M. Brooks (navy)[mappress]Source: navy, May 24, 2011; View post tag: Guided-missile May 24, 2011 View post tag: Gibraltar Guided-Missile Cruiser Transits Strait of Gibraltar View post tag: Strait Back to overview,Home naval-today Guided-Missile Cruiser Transits Strait of Gibraltar Share this articlelast_img read more

Robot football game to be held

first_imgThis year’s Blue and Gold football game weekend will have more than just one football game for some students. The Engineering Department will host its second annual Collegiate Mechatronic Football Competition at Stepan Center on April 23.Jim Schmiedeler, associate professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, said the competition is a one-hour football game between robots built by students.Schmeideler said the competition is part of a 13-week effort to design, build, test and demonstrate the skills of the robots.  “The students have done a terrific job. They have progressed with the help of input from last year’s competition,” Schmeideler said.  The students officially began the design portion of the project in January and started manufacturing and testing their robots after Spring Break, Schmiedeler said.“The students have been driving prototype robots around the halls of Fitzpatrick for a while now, and they’ve been outside kicking field goals and throwing passes,” Schmiedeler said. This is the program’s second official year of competition. “The robots have tackle sensors that light up to indicate a tackle,” Schmiedeler said. “Essentially it shows how hard one robot slams into another.” “Alumni from the Department were interested in sponsoring the event,” Schmiedeler said. “They want to evaluate the success of the competition here at Notre Dame and investigate the possibilities of intercollegiate competition.” While the outcome of the game is important for the trophy, Schmeideler said the grade students receive is based on a test that takes place the week before. The robots go through a series of tests to evaluate their abilities from controllability to kicking and throwing accuracy. center_img The event was started by a Notre Dame alumnus in honor of his son, Brian Hederman, who was a student in the Engineering Department. Hederman, who passed away before he graduated, came up with the idea of a football-playing robot. “Last year’s game had an exciting finish,” Schmiedeler said. “The Blue team fumbled on a drive to the end zone with no time left that would have won them the game. The fans and students were jumping and cheering. It was an intense game.” Students control the robots from the sidelines, and two students are allowed on the field to control the offense.  Also on the field are three referees from RecSports.Motorola sponsors the event, Schmiedeler said. The robots play an adapted version of football in which each team has eight players, and they play on a smaller field with a souvenir-sized football. A completed pass is the quarterback throwing the ball and hitting the receiver, who doesn’t necessarily have to catch the ball to complete the pass.  “We’ve invited faculty and students from other universities to promote the idea of a possible league someday,” Schmeidler said. “We would love to have Notre Dame earn a national title in Collegiate Mechatronic Football.”last_img read more

Inside Marketing: Appealing to younger members

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » The average age of a credit union member worldwide is mid-to-late 40s: In Canada, the median age is 53; in Australia, the United Kingdom and U.S., it’s 47.But with 70 million millennials (born between 1981–1996) and 86 million post-millennials (Gen Z and beyond, born after 1996), it is safe to say that these younger generations will comprise the majority of future credit union memberships in the near future.Unfortunately, 71% of U.S. non-members ages 18-24 are “not at all familiar” or “not very familiar” with credit unions, according to a recent World Council of Credit Unions guide. This demographic will become your base membership in 2042.Millennials were forced to deal with the reality of adulthood during or shortly after the 2008 financial crisis. Both generations grew up with the internet and smartphones. They have diverse opinions on culture, race and politics but common needs when it comes to money and technology.last_img read more

Jumping action takes centre stage at Clonmel

first_imgThe richest race of the session is the I.S.F. EBF Captain Christy Rated Novice Chase worth €20,000 with a field of seven runners going to post.The largest field of the day is the opening Laganore Maiden Hurdle with 18 runners.Tipperary trainer Edward O’Grady was among the winners at Downpatrick last Friday and his representative Allardyce in the concluding Clonmel bumper has prospects in the hands of Barry O’Neill along with Gordon Elliott’s Rakhine State under the in-form Nina Carberry. The first on a 7 race card at Powerstown Park is off at 1.50pm. Photo: © clonmelraces.ielast_img read more