WCC supports new campaign against sexual abuse

first_img Ecumenical & Interreligious [World Council of Churches] The World Council of Churches’ commitment to child rights and gender justice is manifested by its support for Together for Girls’ Every Hour Matters campaign, which was launched last week. The campaign aims to increase awareness of the critical importance of quickly accessing post-rape care.Together for Girls is a global public-private partnership dedicated to ending violence against children, with a focus on sexual violence against girls. The organization claims that one in three women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual violence.Surveys estimate that 25 per cent of girls’ first sexual encounters were forced, the majority of which occurred before the age of 16, and that less than five per cent of sexually abused girls and boys ever obtained services to help them recover.Together for Girls’ mission, as described on the organization’s website, is to mobilize and sustain a global movement to end such deep human rights violations, public health impacts and the long term individual and social consequences associated with violence against children, especially sexual violence against girls.Click here for more details of the Every Hour Matters: A Call for Post-Rape Care campaign. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI WCC supports new campaign against sexual abuse Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Servicecenter_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Mar 16, 2016 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

Student Services Support Short-Term

first_imgLICENSES OR OTHER REQUIREMENTS :Some job assignments may require a valid California driver’slicense and/or possession of a license and/or certificate ofcompletion from an accredited college or agency relative to theassigned area. Continuing education, training or certification maybe required.Knowledge of:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Ability to:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Conditions of EmploymentUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*Employment is contingent upon verification of employment history,background verification as governed under Education Coderequirements, eligibility to work in the United States, andapproval by the CCCD Board of Trustees. Short term/temporaryassignments do not offer fringe benefits or pay for holidays ortime not worked but are entitled to sick leave per Labor Code2810.5. However, CalPERS retired annuitants are not entitled tothis benefit. The hours of work and effective date of employmentwill be arranged with the supervisor.Regular attendance is considered an essential job function; theinability to meet attendance requirements may preclude the employeefrom retaining employment.The person holding this position is considered a mandatedreporter under the California Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Actand is required to comply with the requirements set forth in CoastCommunity College District policies, procedures, and Title IX.(Reference: BP/AP 5910)The Coast Community College District celebrates all forms ofdiversity and is deeply committed to fostering an inclusiveenvironment within which students, staff, administrators, andfaculty thrive. Individual’s interested in advancing the District’sstrategic diversity goals are strongly encouraged to apply.Reasonable accommodations will be provided for qualified applicantswith disabilities who self-disclose.Application materials must be electronically submitted on-lineat http://www.cccd.edu/employment . Incomplete applications and applicationmaterials submitted by mail will not be considered.Additional InformationAPPLICATION REQUIREMENTSTo be considered for employment you must submit a completeapplication packet. A complete application packet includes:Online Employment ApplicationAnswers to all of the supplemental questions.Candidates will also be responsible for all travel expenses ifselected for an interview, the Coast Community College Districtdoes not reimburse for candidate travel expenses.Disability AccommodationsIf you require accommodations in the Application or ExaminationProcess, please notify Human Resources by calling (714)438-4714.PHYSICAL DEMANDS AND WORK ENVIRONMENT The physical demands are representative of those that must bemet by an employee to successfully perform the essential functionsof this job.The work environment characteristics are representative ofthose an employee encounters while performing the essentialfunctions of this job.Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individualswith disabilities to perform the essential functions.A detailed list of physical demands and work environment is onfile and will be provided upon request.The Coast Community College District is a multi-college districtthat includes Coastline Community College , Golden WestCollege , and Orange Coast College . The three colleges offerprograms in transfer, general education, occupational/technicaleducation, community services and student support services.Coastline, Golden West and Orange Coast Colleges enroll more than60,000 students each year in more than 300 degree and certificateprograms.Since it’s founding in 1947, the Coast Community College Districthas enjoyed a reputation as one of the leading community collegedistricts in the United States. Governed by a locally elected Boardof Trustees, the Coast Community College District plays animportant role in the community by responding to needs of achanging and increasingly diverse population.This direct link 2020 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (ASFSR) is the 2020Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for Coast Colleges. Thecrime statistics for calendar years 2017, 2018, and 2019 weresubmitted to the U.S. Department of Education as required under theJeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus CrimeStatistics Act. A hardcopy can be provided from one of the CampusSafety Offices. Please contact any of the Campus Safety Offices forany questions regarding the report.Coast Community College District is an Equal OpportunityEmployerThe Coast Community College District is committed to employingqualified administrators/managers, faculty, and staff members whoare dedicated to student learning and success. The Board recognizesthat diversity in the academic environment fosters awareness,promotes mutual understanding and respect, and provides suitablerole models for all students. The Board is committed to hiring andstaff development processes that support the goals of equalopportunity and diversity, and provide equal consideration for allqualified candidates. The District does not discriminate unlawfullyin providing educational or employment opportunities to any personon the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, genderexpression, religion, age, national origin, ancestry, sexualorientation, marital status, medical condition, physical or mentaldisability, military or veteran status, or geneticinformation.APPLICATIONS MAY BE FILED ONLINE AT:http://www.cccd.edu1370 Adams AvenueCosta Mesa, CA [email protected] DefinitionUnder direct to minimum supervision of the head of the Division,Department, or Program, the non-academic, non-classified short-termsupport employee will provide services to the department to supportand assist regular employees by performing a variety of neededtemporary tasks.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees are notpart of classified service. Non-academic, non-classified short-termemployees are at-will employees, have no entitlement rights to anyposition in the District, and are not benefits eligible. Short-termemployment shall not result in the displacement of Classifiedpersonnel.Non-academic, non-classified short-term employees perform servicesand tasks, which once completed, will not be extended or needed ona continuing basis. Short-term non-classified employees performservices that are not re-occurring and are not a permanentcomponent of the District’s operations. Short-term employees may beemployed to perform work at a one-time event that occurs on anirregular basis.Short-term non classified employees may not exceed 160 workingdays within a fiscal year (July 1 – June 30) and may not exceed 19working hours per week and may only occupy one primary assignmentwithin the District.* Retired CalPERS Annuitants: may not exceed 960 hours in afiscal year (July 1 through June 30)*REPRESENTATIVE DUTIES:On a temporary basis, provides services in support of studentservice programs, division and departments. Performs additionalrelated duties as assigned.Qualifications and Physical DemandsMINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:Education and Experience:Dependent on the specific Division, Department or Program jobassignment.Or, any combination of education an experience that wouldprovide the required equivalent qualifications.last_img read more

Scholars discuss the Thomas Jefferson conundrum, exploring his thoughts on slavery, race

first_imgCourtesy of Chris Parker Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf speak at Notre Dame Law School on Thursday about Thomas Jefferson and his legacy, an event that took place as part of Walk the Walk Week.Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf, a professor at Harvard University and professor emeritus at the University of Virginia, respectively, considered this question in a Thursday lecture. Part of Walk the Walk Week, the lecture was titled “Thomas Jefferson, Race, Slavery, and the Problem of American Nationhood.”The professors are preeminent Jefferson scholars and recently co-wrote a book about the third president. The event took place at the Notre Dame Law School.Onuf introduced this question by first laying out the problematic nature of Jefferson’s position in history.“It is common for pundits to talk about our Jeffersonian democracy, as if that’s a special characteristic of our democracy that makes it unique — you might even say exceptional,” Onuf said. “And then we have to account the dilemma that he wasn’t a perfect guy. He was — we would say now — a racist. No department in the country [now] would hire him.”The Jefferson conundrum has implications about American national identity, Onuf said.“What is it about this moment that makes Thomas Jefferson such a problematic figure? He’s somebody we identify with America,” he said. “There’s a famous … quotation from one of the first great, popular biographies of Jefferson: ‘if Jefferson is right, America is right … If Jefferson is wrong —and that’s what we think about him now — what does that say about us, and where do we go on from here?”Gordon-Reed said Jefferson is unique in that he is a much-discussed Founding Father whose reputation has had a number of peaks and valleys. Ultimately, she said she thinks his complicated life offers an effective way to frame conversations on the founding.“He’s a figure — not like Hamilton, Hamilton was in eclipse until [Lin-Manuel Miranda] brought him back — Jefferson is up and down,” Gordon-Reed said. “It’s hard right now in an era when we’re thinking about inclusion in history, different people’s stories, to figure out what we do with him. The interesting thing to me about it is his life gives us an opportunity to have that kind of discussion in ways that, [with] other members of the founding generation, you can’t do that. You can think about politics, you can think about slavery, you can think about race all through this particular person’s life.”Gordon-Reed said she thinks Jefferson has returned to the fore as a result of the country’s present-day political environment. Though Jefferson did not have a hand in writing the Constitution, he set some important standards with the Declaration of Independence, she said.“We’re sort of in a moment of constitutional crisis now, and people think about the founders — and Jefferson in particular — in a particular kind of way,” she said. “… I’m thinking, ‘what was this all for?’ They put this thing in motion and here we are now, at this particular moment trying to decide what does American democracy, what does the American republic mean in this situation?”Though Onuf said one of Jefferson’s accomplishments in the Declaration of Independence was to create a sense of American peoplehood, the two scholars said Jefferson could not conceptualize a country where black and white people lived together.For his part, he supported the emancipation of slaves but thought they should all be “expatriated” to Africa. These facts present a sobering reality about American national identity, especially as the consensus on what it means to be American has frayed.“The confidence existed because largely one voice was being heard. The difficulty we have now is people are saying, ‘yes, we are a people,’” Gordon-Reed said. “But other people — African-Americans, other groups who do not feel that they were included before — now are beginning to talk about some of the terms of that peoplehood … that’s caused much more fracturing.”Jefferson’s situation in life informed many of his ideas. He came from a family where the men had children with enslaved women. It is widely accepted that the third president himself fathered six children with his slave Sally Hemings, and Gordon-Reed said his wife had half-black siblings. She also said that one of the reasons these issues are perpetually brought up in relation to Jefferson is he wrote all of his thoughts down, leaving a record to attack.“The more I think about this … his personal circumstances had to determine how he saw this,” Gordon-Reed said. “It’s very often when people who have a personal issue — some of the people who are the most vocal in talking about things, whether it’s same-sex sexuality, cross-race sexuality — why are they talking about it? Why is he writing about this? I’ve never had [James] Madison on mixing races. We don’t have George Washington on mixing race … but as far as we know, none of those people were married to people who had half-black siblings living in their house.”Onuf added that the experience of living through the Revolutionary War also had an effect on Jefferson’s thoughts. Particularly, Onuf speculated that the author of the Declaration of Independence was probably worried about a slave revolt.“In revolutionary times, when the future is radically uncertain, you have to be prepared for the next war,” he said. “And another front of that war very reasonably could be — and would be, in the War of 1812 and in other moments [like] 1811 in Louisiana — it could be that enslaved people constitute the biggest threat.”For her part, Gordon-Reed said slaves could not be blamed for harboring rebellious thoughts.“And why wouldn’t they? How could black people love a country that wasn’t their own? That had treated them the way they had been treated? But also that they had not voluntarily come to,” she said. “The idea of black people going back to Africa — that’s the equivalent of a racial epithet now, saying that — but for a person who said ‘these people did not come voluntarily, and we’ve treated them badly. Why would they love us? How could they be in a relationship of community and trust in that situation?’ He’s basically saying, ‘I wouldn’t do that.’”Gordon-Reed also noted some hypocrisy with respect to Jefferson, noting that modern American society chastises him for his ideas when the country still continues to be racially separated.“What we’re asking him to do is something we haven’t done,” she said. “It would be impossible for Jefferson … certainly as a political matter, to say that the answer to all of this is for black people and white people to become one people, as a family. That is to say ‘mix.’ That is something that we don’t do. To think that somebody born in 1743 is going to have that as an idea … it’s patting ourselves on the back. It’s being unrealistic. It’s not anything I think he could have contemplated doing.”As a man of the Enlightenment, Jefferson had a belief that things would constantly improve — that they would get “better and better,” Gordon-Reed said — and that he thought each generation would have to renew America in some way. Paradoxically, the fight for belonging on behalf of group’s that Jefferson marginalized has fulfilled that prophecy to some degree, Onuf said.“The answer to Thomas Jefferson is the refusal of people to go,” he said. “Their insistence that they were American. ’African-American’ — the hyphen is crucial. The assertion of belonging, to be attached to a place … these people are not going. They are us.”Tags: race, slavery, Thomas Jefferson, Walk the Walk Week As the primary author of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson has always occupied a high place in the American pantheon.But Jefferson is also a complicated and controversial figure in American life: how can the United States reconcile the man’s words — “all men are created equal” — with the reality that he owned slaves and espoused ideas that today would be considered racist?last_img read more

Scotbet Chairman criticises over-regulation of high street bookmakers

first_img StumbleUpon YGAM focuses on BAME community engagement with CVR link-up August 21, 2020 Share GambleAware: Engage those with lived experience of gambling harms August 28, 2020 Submit Share Related Articles Marc Etches to step down as CEO of GambleAware in 2021 August 14, 2020 John Heaton, ScotbetJohn Heaton, Chairman of Scotbet, has called upon the Scottish government to ‘strike a balance that respects the right of punters to spend their leisure time and money as they choose, while protecting the small number who get into difficulty’.Writing a column in The Scotsman, he cited the perceived problem of gambling addiction as a major reason for the increased regulation, higher taxes and introduction of full business rates that has forced over 300 high street betting shops to close in the UK over the last two years, which includes 25 for Scotbet.Heaton also suggested that new measures introduced to tackle problem gambling across the industry, which includes the introduction of GambleAware Week, new alerts on gaming machines, restrictions on advertising and a nationwide multi-operator self-exclusion scheme, has moved high street bookies to the ‘forefront of responsible gambling’.“Judging by the tone of some political debate, you might imagine that Scotland has a growing problem with gambling addiction. It doesn’t. The Scottish Government’s own figures show that problem gambling fell to 0.7 per cent in 2015 and is now lower than in 2012. That’s lower than the international average, and much lower than comparative figures for alcohol misuse (26%) and adult obesity (29%).“Our industry supports more than 5,000 jobs in Scotland, many of them women and older people. At a time when the high street is struggling, we continue to invest in our town centres, contributing more than £110 million in taxes and business rates – an average of £112,000 for every shop.”Finally, Heaton responded to the ‘myth’ that Fixed Odds Betting Terminals (FOBTs) have fuelled gambling addiction in the UK, by saying that the level of problem gambling has remained consistent at around 1% for the 15 years that they have been present in betting shops. The average loss on a FOBT in a single session is around £6 and an average session lasts under 9 minutes.last_img read more

Eloise Sheridan and Mary Waldron first women umpire duo to officiate men’s match

first_imgUmpires Eloise Sheridan and Mary Waldron are on the verge of making history as they will be the first women duo to officiate in a men’s first grade premier (club) cricket match, this weekend.Sheridan and Waldron will stand in a match between Tea Tree Gully and Northern Districts in Adelaide featuring Australia vice-captain Travis Head.For Sheridan, officiating in a men’s cricket match is not something new as she stood as an umpire in a South Australian Premier Cricket first grade game, 18 months ago. Earlier, she and NSW umpire Claire Polosak officiated in a Women’s Big Bash League match between the Adelaide Strikers and Melbourne Stars to be the first female pair to officiate a professional match in Australia.Waldron, on the other hand, will be officiating in her first men’s grade match. She played for Ireland in last year’s International Cricket Council (ICC) T20 World Cup and was also a professional football player.”To have so many firsts for female umpires in our State in recent times has been wonderful to see. This achievement for Eloise and Mary is very significant as an Australian first and speaks volumes about how hard they have both worked on their development over the past few seasons,” cricket.com.au quoted SACA State Umpire Coach Daniel Goodwin, as saying.”Our umpires are all appointed to matches on merit and both women are very deserving of the position they are in and the opportunities that are being presented to umpire high-level games,” Goodwin added.advertisementAlso Watch:last_img read more